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Full text of "Official programme and souvenir"









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ED IN 

1 ^MPANX 



SUTTBW'S FORT. 




TTpsfCbmpan/ 

now in existence Xb 
issue a Ilre^olicy on the Pacific ^lope^— 
Assets.* 3,500,000°.° Losses Paid,* 9,000,000 °.° 



-Age/ntsThrooghoutTml 

UNIONS 



-HOME OFFICE-; 

Company's Building. 

S. W. car. California and San same 5ts. S.F. 



D. J. Staples. 


Pres 


W" J. DUTTDN. 


Vice Prei 


B. Faymonville. 


Ass 



\ Official X rogramme and Oouvenir 



Native Sons of the Golden West 



*•**++***••• 



Ninth September Meeting 



San Francisco, 1890 



H. S. CROCKER & CO., 

STATIONERS, PRINTERS AND LITHOGRAPHERS, 

215, 217 AND 219 BUSH STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A Short History of California. 

BY WILLIAM HEATH DAVIS, 

AUTHOR OF "SIXTY YEARS IN CALIFORNIA." 



fT is quite possible that the Spanish navigators Ulloa and Alarcon 
sighted the coast of Alta California, the former in 1539 and the latter 
in 1540. There is no doubt, however, that Cabrillo went into San 
Diego in September, 1542, and named the Port San Miguel; and there 
is a possibility that he was near Monterey shortly before his death in 
1543. It is probable that the Spaniards at that time reached as high 
as Cape Mendocino, named thus after Mendoza, the first viceroy of New 
Spain. The English navigator, Sir Francis Drake, has been given by 
many the credit of the discovery of San Francisco Bay. He certainly 
discovered a portion of the Californian coast above Cape Mendocino; 
but the weight of evidence goes to show that the bay where he came 
to anchor in 1578 was that of Tomales, otherwise called Drake's Bay, 
and not that of San Francisco. Sebastian Vizcaino, bearing the title 
of captain-general, with the three ships San Diego, Corvan and Tres 
Reyes, in 1602 entered Cabrillo's Bay of San Miguel and changed its 
name to San Diego de Alcala, which it has retained ever since. About 
the middle of December, 1602, Vizcaino descried the Sierra of Santa 
Lucia, and, a little beyond, a river which he named El Carmelo. On 
the 1 6th the ships anchored in the Bay of Monterey, thus named by 
him in honor of his patron, the Viceroy Conde de Monterey. Punta de 
Reyes was discovered on the 6th of January, 1603; and on the 12th of 
the same month the San Diego was in latitude 41 ° 30'. Scurvy among 
the crew compelled the departure of the San Diego with the captain- 
general for Mazatlan. The other two ships also had their troubles. 
It may, therefore, be asserted that Vizcaino's only new discovery of 
importance was that of the ' ■ famoso puerto, " as Monterey was after- 
wards called. 

The Spanish government contemplated the occupation of Monterey 



as early as the 17th century; but nothing was then done towards it. 
The Jesuits, prompted by religious zeal, founded a mission at Loreto in 
1697, and, amid much difficulty, continued the work thus commenced, 
erecting and managing several other establishments of the same kind 
in the direction of the territory which in a few years was to be the 
theater of further missionary work, and to bear for some time the title 
of Nuevos Establecimientos, in Alta California. When the Society of 
Jesus had to abandon the field in 1767, Franciscan friars of the Colegio 
de San Fernando in Mexico assumed charge of those missions; and the 
saintly Father Junipero Serra was their president. The government 
at this time had a military post or presidio with about forty soldados 
de cuera, or cuirassiers, under Captain Fernando de Rivera y Moncada 
at Loreto; and the whole country was in that year placed under the rule 
of Captain Gaspar de Portola as civil and military governor. 

The Spaniards had then but a limited knowledge of Upper Cali- 
fornia. They knew the positions of San Diego, Monterey and the port 
called San Francisco under Point Reyes, and were well informed on the 
Santa Barbara channel and its islands, as well as on the nature of the 
soil, and on the peaceful disposition of the Indians. They were at the 
same time aware of the Russian explorations in Alaska from 1741 to 
1765; and the authorities were anxious to guard against encroach- 
ments from that quarter. Hence the immediate occupation of Upper 
California was resolved upon; and the visitador-general of New Spain, 
Jose de Galvez, was fully empowered to fit out expeditions to that end. 
With his characteristic energy and the co-operation of Governor 
Portola, Captain Rivera, Father Serra and his missionaries, he fitted 
out expeditions composed of a portion of the Loreto garrison, twenty - 
five Catalan volunteers under Lieutenant Pedro Fages, and a number 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



of christianized Indians, to go by land and sea to San Diego. Father 
Serra and several other priests accompanied the expeditions. The plan 
of occupation involved the establishment of three missions at the 
commencement for christianizing the natives, and of presidios for the 
defense of the Crown's rights and of the missionaries. The three 
missions were to be at San Diego, Monterey, and some intermediate 
point. Both the naval and land expeditions arrived safely at San 
Diego ; and, leaving out the Indians and sailors of the two transports 
San Antonio and San Carlos, there were assembled on the ist of July 
at that port seventy-eight Spaniards out of the ninety who had started 
to settle in the country. 

After a few days' rest, the governor, leaving behind about forty 
men all told, marched northward, taking with him Captain Rivera, 
Sergeant Jos6 Francisco Ortega, a most useful officer, with twenty-six 
soldados de cuera, Lieutenant Fages with six or seven of his Catalans, 
— all that the scurvy had left alive or fit for duty, — Costanso the cos- 
mographer, Fathers Crespi and Gomez, and a few servants and Indians. 
On arrival in sight of Punta de Pinos, the expeditionists saw from a 
hill a wide entrance and mistook it for one that Cabrera Bueno's map 
placed between Punta de Afio Nuevo and Punta de Pinos, and thus 
missed the port they were looking for. In their subsequent endeavors 
to find it, from Point San Pedro, Point Reyes was descried on the 30th 
of October ; and the camp was pitched at the southern end of the 
Ensenada de los Farallones, from whence Sergeant Ortega went to 
explore the region of Point Reyes. Some of his soldiers from the 
northern hills beheld the great Bay of San Francisco. Ortega is entitled 
to the credit of being the first white man who explored the peninsula 
on which stands the great city of San Francisco. The Indians had a 
tradition that the Golden Gate at one time was an isthmus, and that 
the natural outlet of the Bay of San Francisco was through the Santa 
Clara valley to Monterey Bay. 

Governor Portola returned in safety to San Diego in January, 1770. 
The transport San Antonio was forthwith dispatched to Monterey, 
conveying Father Serra, Costanso, Surgeon Prat, and supplies for the 
foundation of the mission there. The governor with Father Crespi, 
Fages with twelve of his Catalans, seven soldados de cuera and a few 
Indians marched to the north ; and on the 24th of May, walking along 



the beach, they saw the port so clearly described by Vizcaino and the 
pilot Cabrera Bueno. A few days later the San Antonio arrived ; and 
on the 3d of June the new mission was founded in due form. This 
being done, Governor Portola placed Lieutenant Fages in charge of 
the Nuevos Establecimientos as military commandant, and leaving 
behind the Catalan soldiers, and the priests Serra and Crespi, sailed 
away with Costanso on the San Antonio, on his way back to Lower 
California. Dissensions between Fages and the missionaries may 
have been the cause of Fages' recall in May, 1774, when he was super- 
seded by Captain Rivera, who was only nominally a subordinate of 
Felipe Barry, governor of the Californias. Rivera and Father Fran- 
cisco Palou explored the peninsula of San Francisco in that year. In 
1769 Rivera had passed some days on the San Francisquito creek. On 
the ist of December, 1774, his camp was on a stream flowing into 
Lake Merced, when he visited the Seal Rocks and the Cliff. Next 
year, in October, an expedition of soldiers and their families, and 
colonists — 207 persons all told — under Lieutenant-Colonel Anza, 
came to found the presidio and mission of San Francisco, which was 
completed on the 4th of October, 1776. That expedition brought a 
large quantity of horses, mules and horned cattle. 

In August, 1775, the Crown resolved that the seat of government of 
the Californias should be at Monterey, and Governor Felipe de Neve 
came therein February, 1777; henceforth the commandant at Loreto 
was ex officio lieutenant-governor of the Californias. Neve organized 
the military government of the country, which involved its colonization 
and the establishment of pueblos, or towns, as well as a system to 
manage the missions then existing or to be created. His ordinance 
went provisionally into effect in 1781, and after being sanctioned by 
the Crown was the law of the land during the domination of Spain. 
The governor held civil, military and judicial authority, as well as the 
vice patronato over the Church as representative of the Sovereign. He 
was subordinate to the comandante-general of the Provincias Internas 
of Mexico in matters of government, and to the vicero3' of New Spain 
in military affairs. Governor Neve ruled till 1782, and was succeeded 
by Lieutenant-Colonel Pedro Fages, during whose rule, in 1 7S6, the 
French commander, La Perouse, on his voyage round the world, visited 
Monterey with the ships Bousole and Astrolabe. Lieutenant-Colonel 




t^ !-" 









JASPER FISHBOURNE, 
Past Grand President. 




FRANK J. HIGGINS, 
Past Grand President. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST 



Josfi Antonio Ronien followed Fages in 1791, and died at Monterey in 
April, 1792, when Captain Jose Joaquin de Arrillaga, commandant at 
Loreto. and lieutenant-governor, assumed the reins, acting as governor 
till 1 704, when Colonel Diego de Borica became the ruler. In November, 
Vancouver was in San Francisco with the ship Discovery. 
Borica's rule was somewhat noted for its efforts, amid great difficulties 
from the want of teachers and books, to develop primary education. On 
the governor's resignation and departure in 1800, Arrillaga became 
acting governor again, while Lieutenant-Colonel Pedro Alberni, by rea- 
son oi superior rank, held command of the forces till his death in 1802. 
Arrillaga moved to Monterey in 1805. The Californias had ere this 
been divided into two distinct provinces; and Arrillaga had been made 
governor of Nueva California, as this portion was then called. He held 
the office in peace till 1S14, when he died at the Soledad mission; and 
the senior officer, Captain Josef Dario Argiiello, assumed the govern- 
ment ad i ntcri?>!, retaining it till 1815, when he was relieved by Colonel 
Pablo Vicente de Sola. Argiiello, having been appointed governor of 
the other California, departed and never returned. He was a good offi- 
cer and a sterling man, and the founder of the numerous Argiiello fam- 
ily of California. Sola was the last Spanish ruler. In 1818 Bouchard, 
with two ships under the insurgent flag of Buenos Ayres, bombarded 
Monterey, and committed other hostile acts on the coast of California. 
After Mexico became independent from Spain in 1821, Emperor 
Agustin Iturbide caused the Mexican flag to be hoisted over California 
the following year, the authorities, inhabitants and troops swearing 
allegiance to the new government. Governor Sola went to Mexico, as 
deput\- to the Constituent Congress ; and Captain Luis Antonio Argiie- 
llo, a native of California, was chosen Governor ad interim of the 
province. The Spanish Constitution of 1820 was proclaimed to be 
provisionally in force, under which the country, for the first time, 
had a sort of legislative body, composed of the governor and seven 
members, and which bore the name of diputacion provincial. This 
arrangement continued till the federal system was established in 
Mexico. California then was declared a territory, with a diputacion 
territorial, and with the right of representation in the National Con- 
gress. Lieutenant-Colonel Jose Maria de Echeandia became, in 1825, 
the jefe politico and comandante-general, and brought with him the 



laws and regulations to reform the institutions. Under the new system 
alcaldes and ayuntamientos, chosen by popular vote, were established 
in the chief towns, and alcaldes only in other places. During this rule 
the secularization of the missions was begun; and Indian towns, with 
native alcaldes, were organized, where the secularization was carried 
out. Echeandia had to put down seditions among the troops in 1828 
and 1829. He was succeeded, in 1831, by Lieutenant-Colonel Manuel 
Victoria, who, for despotic and cruel acts, was driven out of California 
by the people, but not before the country, through his instrumentality, 
lost one of its best officers, Captain Romualdo Pacheco, the father of 
ex-Governor Pacheco, killed near Los Angeles. The country was, for 
a time, under a dual government, — one in the north and one in the 
south, — headed by Captain Zamorano and Echeandia, until 1833, when 
General Jose Figueroa became jefe politico and comandante-general, 
which positions he held till his death in 1835. Figueroa continued, 
with much prudence, the secularization of the missions. In 1834, a 
colony of about three hundred persons came from Mexico, many of 
whom permanently settled here, and left descendants. Some of them, 
or their offspring, afterwards became prominent citizens. The settle- 
ment of Sonoma, under Lieutenant Mariano G. Vallejo, was effected 
by Figueroa's order; and it was also he who authorized the establish- 
ment of civil government in San Francisco, and trading to be carried on 
between the then hamlet of Yerba Buena and the ships lying in the baj\ 
After Figueroa's death California witnessed several political turmoils, 
which, no doubt, retarded her progress for a time. The next rulers 
were Colonel Mariano Chico and Lieutenant-Colonel Nicolas Gutierrez; 
both of whom, becoming distasteful to the Californians, were deposed; 
and Juan Bautista Alvarado, the ablest native Califomian of that 
period, became governor, holding the position from 1836 to 1842. The 
federal system had ceased to exist in Mexico, and consequently here. 
Alvarado, with the aid of his uncle, Comandante-General Vallejo, 
and of his cousin, Jose Castro, quelled a few revolts. It was he who 
caused the arrest, in 1840, of a number of foreigners, who were sent 
as prisoners to Mexico, accused of conspiring against the Mexican 
sovereignty. He believed them guilty, and acted accordingly. The 
Mexican government thought otherwise, and released them. General 
Manuel Micheltorena came out in 1842, with unlimited powers to 



George B <>perr.y. James Hooc. 

JUSTIN B ^PERR.Y. 

SECRETARY 

JamesW.^perry A-WcS impson 

Fred. M.West. 



T/ V500 PAR Rfy^ 



C*blet\doress SPERRY 



CAp^ClTy • £©00 • H)/lRRErU> Daily. 




<&PErRRy,S a 
'iSBSTpflMILy 

"WlUARD" 
'FULLJSATeNT' 







wfmrffers. 

MAHUF/lcruPFR^ op 

THE.JOHNT- ©UTTING e0.50Llr/lG&NTS 




H. C. CHIPMAN, 

/'ait Grand President. 




JNO. H. GRADY, 
Past Grand President. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



i ovulate the country's affairs. In that year Commodore Thomas Ap 
Catesby Jones, commanding the United States squadron, believing that 
war had broken out between Mexico and his country, in October made 
himself master of Monterey; but the next day, on becoming convinced 
that no war existed, he returned the place to the Mexican authorities, 
and saluted their flag. Micheltorena was personally liked by the Cal- 
ifornians; but some of his officers and the battalion he had brought 
out being charged with offenses which the California politicians made 
a pretext of, a revolution broke out, which ended with the departure 
of the governor and his troops from the country in 1845, when Pio 
Pico, as senior member of the Departmental Assembly, became acting 
governor, establishing his capital at Los Angeles; and Jos6 Castro 
assumed command of the troops, with headquarters at Monterey. 
The relations between the north and south, never very cordial, became 
now positively hostile, and a rupture was only prevented by the fear 
of the foreign element, which had been, for a few years past, rapidly 
growing in the Sacramento valley. During Pico's short administra- 
tion several of the secularized and ruined missions were sold. As the 
following events show, he was the last Mexican ruler in California. 
He is still living at Los Angeles, aged probably over ninety years. 

Under Governor Neve's ordinance of 1781 were founded the towns 
of San Jose and Los Angeles. Each settler was given a town lot and 
a piece of land for raising crops, besides some live-stock, seed and the 
needed agricultural implements, the original cost of which he was 
bound to repay in five years. During these five years he was allowed 
annually a small amount, not exceeding $60 in any one year, in 
clothing and other necessary supplies. The town was given pasture 
lands and the free use of wood and water ; and during five years the 
townsmen were free from taxation. On their part, they were bound to 
sell to the presidios the surplus of their products at fair prices. Each 
settler had likewise to hold himself in readiness, with horses and 
arms, to render military services in cases of emergency. The lands 
given the pobladores were within four square leagues from the center 
of the town. The grantees could neither sell nor encumber them. 
Other necessary duties were imposed, all of which were for the benefit 
of the town and its dwellers. At first the governor appointed the 



municipal officers; but after that the vecinos had the privilege of 
choosing them; but the governor, during the Spanish domination, 
usually had a non-commissioned officer at each town, as his comi- 
sionado, to represent him and carry out his orders. 

Though the pueblo of La Reina de los Angeles was founded in 
1781, with twelve settlers and their families, — forty-six persons in all, — 
it was only in 1786 that the nine settlers then existing there were 
formally placed in possession of their lands by Alferez Josef Argiiello, 
pursuant to the governor's orders. The town of San Jose Guadalupe 
had been informally settled in 1777; but in May, 1783, Lieutenant 
Moraga, of the presidio of San Francisco, fulfilled the task of meas- 
uring out the settlers ' lands and carrying out the other requirements 
of the ordinance. The towns were later occupied by settlers from 
Mexico or by retired soldiers from the presidial companies. None but 
men of good character were permitted to become such settlers. In 
1797 the Villa de Branciforte was founded near the mission of Santa 
Cruz, with nine pobladores, the comisionado and the military guard. 
The settlers were not of the most desirable class, and never became 
noted for industrious habits. However, under pressure, they managed 
to raise, in 1800, a pretty good crop of wheat, maize and beans. They 
also owned about five hundred head of cattle. 

The mission system organized under Neve's ordinance was different 
from that which existed in the other provinces of Mexico. It evidently 
aimed at curtailing the power of the missionaries. The natives were 
to be christianized only through precept and example. For offenses 
committed by them, imprisonment and flogging might be inflicted; but 
the justness of such punishment should be made clear to their chiefs. 
The military guards should endeavor to gain the respect and good 
will of the chiefs, but were to keep away from the rancherias unless 
called there by duty. 

The first mission was founded by President Serra, on the 16th of 
July, 1769, at Cosoy, the site of the old town of San Diego, and dedi- 
cated to San Diego de Alcala. The second mission, that of San Carlos 
Borromeo, was founded, by the same priest, at Monterey, on the 3d 
of June, 1770, and about a year later was transferred to the Carmelo 
valley, which afforded, among other advantages, a greater supply of 




A. F. JONES, 
Past Grand President. 









Ims *^ ?■ 






.;■ 





JNO. A. STEINBACH, 
/W Grand President. 



10 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS' OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



water. In 1771 ten new missionaries arrived from Mexico. The next 
missions founded were San Antonio, in 1771 ; San Gabriel Areangel 
the same year ; San Luis Obispo in 1773 ; San Francisco de Asis on the 
4th of October, 1776 ; San Juan Capistrano in the same year ; Santa 
Clara in 1777. The total number of missions was twenty-one. The 
other thirteen were founded as follows: San Buenaventura in 1782; 
Santa Barbara in 17S6 ; La Purisima ConceDcion in 1789; Santa Cruz 
in 1 79 1 ; La Soledad the same year ; San jose in 1797; San Miguel 
Areangel, San Fernando and San Juan Bautista the same year ; San 
Luis Rey in 1798; Santa Ines in 1804; San Rafael in 1817; and, 
lastly, San Francisco Solano (Sonoma) in 1824. All the missions 
were in charge of priests of the College of San Fernando, who had 
two prelates over them, namely, the president ,who had especial charge 
of spiritual matters, and the prefecto, who controlled temporal affairs. 
In 1S33, however, by a preconcerted arrangement, the northern mis- 
sions were turned over to priests of the College of Guadalupe of 
Queretaro. The priests — most particularly the old Fernandinos — were 
men of pure character. Many of them were men of talent, education 
and executive ability. They worked zealously to carry out the 
objects for which the missions were established, that is to say, chris- 
tianizing the Indians, and teaching them the arts of peace. Hospi- 
tality unlimited was the rule in the missions, as it was, indeed, 
throughout the country. 

Each mission had a church, a mansion for the priests, quarters for 
guests, and for employes of a higher order than neophytes; also ware- 
houses and granaries, and a guardhouse and habitations for the sol-, 
diers and their families. Most of the missions manufactured woolen 
goods, saddles, bridles, boots, shoes, etc. The Indians were well cared 
for, generously fed, and taught many arts and trades. Some of them 
became musicians. In a few words, the priests looked out for their 
spiritual and bodily welfare. All the missions were wealthy, and 
increased their riches by means of agriculture, the breeding of cattle, 
and trade in hides, tallow, etc. 

A time came when the government adopted the policy of seculariz- 
ing the missions. The work, commenced with some prudence, was in 
after years carried out in the most reckless manner. The missions 
were mostly placed in the hands of greedy and unprincipled men; 



and the government had them stripped of their cattle and other prop- 
erty; and the Indians, finding themselves eventually uncontrolled and 
unprovided for, scattered, became demoralized, or died off. The result 
was that by the 3'ear 1839 the missions were but mere skeletons of 
their former selves. The lands, excepting the sites of the buildings, 
orchards and vineyards, were finally granted to private individuals. 

The military organization of California, in the latter part of the 
Spanish domination, consisted of four presidios, to wit, San Diego, 
Santa Barbara, Monterey and^ San Francisco. Each was garrisoned 
by a cavalry company, with about ninety men each, the officers being a 
captain, a lieutenant and an alferez. During a few years a company 
of Catalan volunteers— about one hundred men — was stationed here. 
There were also a few artillerymen, and in 1819 a company of cav- 
alry, and one of infantry, were added to the force. In the early years 
of the occupation most of the soldiers were recruited in Mexico; but 
afterwards the ranks were filled with native Californians of Spanish 
extraction. The supplies for them came regularly from Mexico; but 
after the war broke out there for independence they often failed, and 
the troops suffered severely for the want of many necessary things. 
The organization was kept up until the Americans occupied the coun- 
try. Besides the presidial companies, there were militia bodies, 
called Defensores de la Patria. And yet, as a matter of fact, the 
country was defenseless against invaders. 

The history of the Russian settlement at Bodega, which port had 
been discovered by the Spaniards in 1775, and at Ross, dates from the 
visit of Kuskof, who came to that port on the Kadiak early in Jan- 
uary, 1809, and remained there for several months, and explored the 
adjoining region. With gifts he gained the good will of the natives, 
who made no opposition to his erecting some buildings. He succeeded 
in procuring a large quantity of otter skins, and returned safely to 
Sitka in October of the same year. The Spaniards soon learned of his 
visit. Kuskof's report on the country induced the Russian-American 
Company to petition their sovereign to obtain from Spain leave to 
form settlements in the explored region, in order to raise wheat for the 




A. F. JONES, 
Past Grand President. 




JNO. A. STEINBACH, 
Past Grand President, 



10 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST 



water. In 1771 ten new missionaries arrived from Mexico. The next 
missions founded were San Antonio, in 1771 ; San Gabriel Arcangel 
the samo year ; San Luis Obispo in 1773 ; San Francisco de Asis on the 
4th of October, 1776; San Juan Capistrano in the same year; Santa 
Clara in 1777. The total number of missions was twenty-one. The 
other thirteen were founded as follows: San Buenaventura in 1782; 
Santa Barbara in 17S6 : La Purisima Conceocion in 1789; Santa Cruz 
in 1 791 ; La Soledad the same year ; San jos6 in 1797; San Miguel 
Arcangel, San Fernando and San Juan Bautista the same year ; San 
Luis Rey in 1798; Santa Ines in 1804; San Rafael in 1817; and, 
lastly, San Francisco Solano (Sonoma) in 1824. All the missions 
were in charge of priests of the College of San Fernando, who had 
two prelates over them, nainel}-, the president ,who had especial charge 
of spiritual matters, and the prefecto, who controlled temporal affairs. 
In 1833, however, by a preconcerted arrangement, the northern mis- 
sions were turned over to priests of the College of Guadalupe of 
Queretaro. The priests — most particularly the old Fernandinos — were 
men of pure character. Many of them were men of talent, education 
and executive ability. They worked zealously to carry out the 
objects for which the missions were established, that is to say, chris- 
tianizing the Indians, and teaching them the arts of peace. Hospi- 
tality unlimited was the rule in the missions, as it was, indeed, 
throughout the country. 

Each mission had a church, a mansion for the priests, quarters for 
guests, and for employes of a higher order than neophytes; also ware- 
houses and granaries, and a guardhouse and habitations for the sol- 
diers and their families. Most of the missions manufactured woolen 
goods, saddles, bridles, boots, shoes, etc. The Indians were well cared 
for, generously fed, and taught many arts and trades. Some of them 
became musicians. In a few words, the priests looked out for their 
spiritual and bodily welfare. All the missions were wealthy, and 
increased their riches by means of agriculture, the breeding of cattle, 
and trade in hides, tallow, etc. 

A time came when the government adopted the policy of seculariz- 
ing the missions. The work, commenced with some prudence, was in 
after 5-ears carried out in the most reckless manner. The missions 
were mostly placed in the hands of greedy and unprincipled men; 



and the government had them stripped of their cattle and other prop- 
erty; and the Indians, finding themselves eventually uncontrolled and 
unprovided for, scattered, became demoralized, or died off. The result 
was that by the 3'ear 1839 the missions were but mere skeletons of 
their former selves. The lands, excepting the sites of the buildings, 
orchards and vineyards, were finally granted to private individuals. 

The military organization of California, in the latter part of the 
Spanish domination, consisted of four presidios, to wit, San Diego, 
Santa Barbara, Monterey and San Francisco. Each was garrisoned 
by a cavalry company, with about ninety men each, the officers being a 
captain, a lieutenant and an alferez. During a few years a company 
of Catalan volunteers — about one hundred men — was stationed here. 
There were also a few artillerymen, and in 1819 a company of cav- 
alry, and one of infantry, were added to the force. In the early years 
of the occupation most of the soldiers were recruited in Mexico; but 
afterwards the ranks were filled with native Californians of Spanish 
extraction. The supplies for them came regularly from Mexico; but 
after the war broke out there for independence the}' often failed, and 
the troops suffered severely for the want of many necessary things. 
The organization was kept up until the Americans occupied the coun- 
try. Besides the presidial companies, there were militia bodies, 
called Defensores de la Patria. And yet, as a matter of fact, the 
country was defenseless against invaders. 

The history of the Russian settlement at Bodega, which port had 
been discovered by the Spaniards in 1775, and at Ross, dates from the 
visit of Kuskof, who came to that port on the Kadiak early in Jan- 
uary, 1809, and remained there for several months, and explored the 
adjoining region. With gifts he gained the good will of the natives, 
who made no opposition to his erecting some buildings. He succeeded 
in procuring a large quantity of otter skins, and returned safely to 
Sitka in October of the same year. The Spaniards soon learned of his 
visit. Kuskof's report on the country induced the Russian-American 
Compan}' to petition their sovereign to obtain from Spain leave to 
form settlements in the explored region, in order to raise wheat for the 



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WITH SECURITY 

NEW MUTUAL INVESTMENT and 

DIVIDEND INVESTMENT 
PLANS. 

HAVE NO SUPERIORS. 







imWA *> l 



ACCIDENT POUGIES 
and TICKETS. 
GIVING GREATEST 
PROTECTION 
and ADVANTAGES for. DI5ABILIT' 
LOSSofUFE or LIMB 



•-•ORGANIZED BT PIONEEBS «- •'. 

- : •• MANAGED BYQ^UFORNIANS * - • 
^OLE-ljFEMCOlDENT (&MPANY -'LOANING 

Its Funds mTH&6ou)EN West 

• - ? DEVELOPING its RESOURCES • • - 






; 



HbMt Office 



LI FWSiroNGE COMPANY 
of CALIFORNIA. 



418 CALIFORNIA ST. _ 

§Aj^RANei|CO. 

ISE 



-^^jffiD C^jQrL. 







$> 



With most LiberaiJTrms as to 

NON- FDRFEI JURE, RESIDENCE, 

TRA VEL , D CCU PA TIDN. ETC. 
\00 



ef42.200.000 -- 

-Paid Policy Holders 
$ 4.500.000°° 




FRED H. GKEELY, 

Past Giand President. 




DR. C. W. DECKER, 
Past Grand President. 



12 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST 



use of the Russian colony at Alaska. The Emperor did not accede to 
the petition, but gave the company to understand that if they made a 
settlement on the Californian coast they might rely on his protection, 
should it ever be needed. The Russians also exerted themselves to 
open commercial relations with the Spaniards in California, but met 
with no encouragement, and resorted to smuggling and surreptitious 
hunting for otter skins on the coast. Finally, Kuskof returned in 
1812 on the Chirikofto make a settlement at once. He brought 
nearly two hundred men, including about eighty Aleuts, and a con- 
siderable number of bidarkas. Hunting for sea otter was now freely 
carried on, though the hunters avoided the Port of San Francisco. 
The Spanish authorities, though aware of the presence of the Russians 
at Bodega, made no attempt to expel them, but simply watched 
them. From that time the settlement was maintained, crops were 
raised at Ross, and ships and boats were built at Bodega. After the 
Spanish domination ceased, the Mexicans were jealous of their 
Russian neighbors; but, with the exception of a few bickerings with 
the commandant at Sonoma, friendly relations were maintained, and 
considerable trading was kept up with the Californian missions and 
ranchers, especially in cereals, soap and manteca, mostly paid for in 
coin. The Californiaus, generally speaking, considered the Russians 
very good friends. But the settlement ceased to be profitable to the 
Russians after they had nearly exterminated the sea otter on this por- 
tion of the coast. They then resolved to sell out, and in 1841 their com- 
mandant, Alexander Rottscheff, effected a sale of the buildings and 
stock at Ross and Bodega to John A. Sutter, for the sum of $50,000, 
payable in 3-early installments, in wheat raised by him in the Sacra- 
mento valley, and deliverable in San Francisco. All the install- 
ments were eventually paid. This put an end to the Russian settle- 
ment on the Californian coast. 

The procurement of furs, as an article of trade, began as early as 
17S7 in California. It was carried on at first on government account; 
and in that year its agent took to Mexico about 1,600 sea-otter skins, 
which were obtained from the missions. In 1790 the government re- 
solved to leave the business to private enterprise. The Russians, with 
their Aleuts and bidarkas and the aid of American vessels, were en- 
gaged in otter-hunting on the coast from iSioto 184.1. In those years 



ing and trapping otter and beaver. This business was afterwards carried 
on mostly by foreigners down to the conquest of the country by the 
United States, and even later. Hunters and trappers, counting at first 
by hundreds, and gradually increasing into the thousands, frequented, 
from 1826 on, the fur-producing streams of the far West, including the 
valleys of California, many of them wandering from place to place, 
merely in search of more abundant game. They became well acquainted 
with the country ; but few, if any, have left any record of their opera- 
tions. Hence the impossibility of giving any accurate information 
respecting their numbers or doings. A number who settled here have 
furnished their recollections; and it is believed a few of those men are 
still living. It is understood that Jedediah S. Smith was the first of 
the adventurers. He left a post at or near Salt Lake in August, 1826, 
and reached San Gabriel mission with about sixteen companions. Such 
visits were illegal, and the authorities were almost always stringent in 
their measures against the strangers until the latest years, when they 
had to be more tolerant. John J. Warner of Los Angeles was one of 
the trappers who came in the decade 1830-40. Jedediah S. Smith vis- 
ited California again in 1827, when he was permitted to take away one 
hundred mules, one hundred and fifty horses, provisions and other 
effects, besides one gun for each man of his part}-. Among the earl}' 
otter hunters in California was George Yount, who probably came in 
1831 or 1832, and settled in Napa valley. Jim Black came from Scot- 
land about the same time, and, like Timothy Murphy, settled in San 
Rafael. Francis Branch arrived in Santa Barbara in 1833. Other hun- 
ters were James I. Pattie and his son Sylvester, Isaac J. Sparks, 
Miguel Pryor, Richard Laughlin, William Pope, Isaac Slover, Jesse 
Ferguson, James Puter, Campbell, Carmichael, Lawrence, Job Francis 
Dye, George Nidever, Lewis T. Burton, Samuel J. Hensley, P. B. 
Reading, Thomas L. Smith and Daniel Sill, all of whom, it is 
believed, were Americans, settled in California, and most of them 
raised families. 

The Hudson's Bay Company had trappers in their employ who 
came to California and hunted for furs. Little is known about their 
operations before 1835, other than that furnished by J. J. Warner, 




C. H. G\ROUTTE, 
Past Grand President, 




M. A. DORN, 
Past Grand President. 



14 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



who said that they came in 1828 to look after Jedediah S. Smith's inter- 
ests. This party, under McLeod, visited the Sacramento valley that 
year and made a success. Another expedition, under Ogden, visited 
California before 1832. Trappers of the company were in Yerba 
Buena as early as 1841, 1842 and 1843, visiting their company's estab- 
lishment to deliver the products of their hunt. The Hudson's Bay 
Com pan y, b3' their governor, McLaughlin, established a post in Yerba 
Buena in 1S41, and appointed as their agent William G. Rae, a noble 
and high-minded man. The company from this time kept a store with 
a large stock of miscellaneous English goods for trading purposes, 
doing a good business until Rae's death in 1845, m which year the 
establishment was discontinued. 

Fort Sutter, founded by John A. Sutter, and the early settlement 
of the Sacramento valley, are subjects of the highest interest to Amer- 
icans, and especially Californians. Captain Sutter, with a few German 
or Swiss mechanics, and three Hawaiians and their wives, arrived at 
San Francisco from Honolulu, via Sitka, in June, 1839, on the brigan- 
tine Clementine, intending to settle in the Sacramento valley, which at 
that time was a wilderness. Under instructions from Mr. Nathan 
Spear, the author of this history took command of the expedition, 
composed of the schooners Isabel and Nicholas, and a four-oared boat 
under sail, to convey Sutter and his party to the valley. Sutter had 
two cannons and other arms, as well as ammunition, which he might 
need for defense against hostile Indians. They left Yerba Buena 
Harbor on the 9th of August, 1839, from alongside the American ship 
Monsoon, for the valley, then inhabited solely by Indians, among 
whom were some neophytes, who, after the impoverishment of their 
missions, had returned to uncivilized life. In about eight days Sutter 
and his party were landed on the American river. He lost no time 
in mounting his guns, and within a short time, when he found a 
suitable site, built a fort, and placed on it his two brass pieces, and 
added to them from time to time some more artillery acquired from 
ships, and from his purchase of Ross and Bodega. His purpose was 
to form a colony of Swiss mostly, and of other nationalities, and 
thus develop the country around his fort. To this intended settle- 
ment he gave the name of Nueva Helvecia. It was destined to be a 



most important factor in the political changes that began in 1846 
and culminated with the great event that startled the world, the gold 
discovery in 1848 at Sutter's mill. The new establishment soon 
started the apprehensions of the Mexican authorities at Sonoma. 
Sutter in the course of time developed agriculture on a large scale, 
for the time, and for which he possessed the necessary elements; 
and his growing herds of cattle and horses were increased by acqui- 
sitions from different hacendados. His supplies were principally 
from Nathan Spear, and were paid for generally in beaver and 
otter skins. He also made wine and brandy from the wild grapes. 
After a short while the government appointed Sutter justice of the 
peace for that district. His Indian policy was both wise and successful, 
thus making friends of the surrounding tribes ; indeed, he had an 
unusual tact for making friends among men of all races. He was 
now prepared, as early as 1841, to welcome the immigrants who in 
such large numbers came overland and poured upon the valley of the 
Sacramento from that year till long after the United States acquired 
the country; all of whom, with very rare exceptions, indeed, testified 
to the hospitality and aid they received at his hands, which enabled 
them to effect their settlements. Sutter was now the master of a 
princely domain, the owner of large herds and flocks; and the incoming 
stream of immigrants gave a greater value to his lands. The Sacra- 
mento river was thoroughly surveyed by Commodore Wilkes, of the 
U. S. exploring expedition, in 1841. Wilkes stopped at Sutter's fort, 
and speaks in glowing terms of his kind treatment by Sutter. 

The population of California about 1838-39 was probably 12,000, 
exclusive of Indians, of whom there were about 20,000 christianized. 
Among the earliest foreign settlers were the following: Jose' Bolcof, Rus- 
sian, 1815; Joseph Chapman, 1818; Thomas Doak, American, 1816; John 
Gilroj 7 , Englishman, John Rose, John M. Johnson, Jeremiah Jones, 
John Bones, Philip Pellom, 182 1; in 1822, W. E. P. Hartnell, David 
Spence, Juan B. Bonifacio, William A. Richardson, John Martin, 
Robert Livermore; in 1823, John B. R. Cooper, Thomas M. Robbins, 
William Borris; Jose Bandini came in 1819, and his son Juan in 
1824; James Watson, 1824; Alfred Robinson, 1829; Luis Vignes, 
1831; Charles Baric, 1834; Dr. E. T. Bale, 1837; Jos6 Antonio Aguirre, 




-ttoyeMc/fy \ ^W^^^tMFL J"^P^T-~ x : * CALIFORNIA- 

CRPO^t7oT{- f r, , • /Sanl/folTonery ooi/ih/, ComplelC- • : . 

fofaCnst yoASm Label/ and \vrappety of Late/tDe/"i6nr. 

JisW for catalogues. 




NORTH CHINA INS 

Limited. 



~of .SHANGHAI 

and YANGTZE IN5URANe^WWlATl!)W^^p 
riARlNt SHANGHAI 



E§M r (°HIN/^ 




FRANK D. RYAN, 
Junior Past Grand President. 




WM. H. MILLER, 
Grand President. 



16 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



1834; George Kinlock, 1830; Thomas 0. Larkin, 1832; James Stokes, 
1S24; Jacob P. Leese, 1833; Daniel Hill, 1823; William G. Dana, 
[826; John Read, 1S28; Nicholas A. Den, 1836; Joseph P. Thompson, 
1S39: Josiah Belden, 1841. John Bidwell, 1841 ; Alexander Bell, 
1S42; Nathan Spear, 1S23; Win. D. M. Howard, 1839; Henry Melius, 
1835; Francis Melius, 1839; Abel Stearns, 1829; James Alexander 
Forbes, 1831; Talbot H. Green, whose true name was Paul Geddes, 
1S4J. To give anything like a list of later arrivals would occupy too 
much space. 

The native population of Spanish extraction had probably in- 
creased somewhat to 1846 ; but the foreign immigration across the 
plains down to this 3-ear had been quite large, say several thousands. 
The Mexican authorities had become much alarmed at this irruption 
of foreigners, hardly one of whom had the papers required by the 
Mexican government to enter the territory. They were at a loss what 
to do, as it was beyond their power to prevent this influx of people; 
and yet it would have been impolitic on their part to openly acknowl- 
edge their helplessness. The orders of the Mexican government to 
their authorities here were peremptory, — to expel from the territory all 
foreigners who did not bring Mexican passports; but Commandjint- 
General Castro, in view of the difficult situation he was placed in, 
concluded to let those who had already come remain, under promise 
of legalizing their stay after the expiration of the winter of 1845-46. 

Captain John C. Fremont, at the head of a United States explor- 
ing expedition, for the second time entered California early in Jan- 
uary, 1S46. On the 27th of that month he was in Monterey in 
consultation with Thomas O. Larkin, the American consul. The 
commandant-general of the forces, Castro, at once wrote to Larkin 
asking to be informed of the purpose for which United States 
troops had entered the country, as well as of the object of the 
Captain's visit to Monterey. He was told that Fremont's men were 
not soldiers, but were hired men, and that the expedition had been 
sent by his government to find a practicable route to the Pacific. 
His coming to Monterey had been for the purpose of procuring 
clothing, as well as funds wherewith to purchase animals and 
provisions. He declared his visit to be of a peaceable nature, and 
that as soon as his men, then on the frontier of the department, had 



rested, he would start for Oregon. This explanation being deemed 
satisfactory, no opposition was made to his movements. A few 
days later Fremont departed to rejoin his men. But in his absence 
the latter had marched to meet him, and at noon on the 15th of Feb- 
ruary found their commander and his company at the Laguna de 
Alvires, about ten or eleven miles southeast of the city of San Jose. 
The force, now numbered sixty men, with whom Fremont, disregard- 
ing his pledge to Castro, marched through the country and encamped 
in the Alisal, Hartnell's ranch. In view of this, Castro demanded that 
he should leave the country at once, which order Fremont paid no heed 
to, and verbally he made known his refusal to depart. He then 
moved his camp to the Gavilan Hill, where he fortified himself, hoist- 
ing over it the American flag, a very strange proceeding for an Ameri- 
can officer to do in a foreign country then at peace with his own. Castro 
dispatched a force to besiege him ; but in the night Fremont and his 
party escaped. 

Returning from Oregon a little later, in May, Fremont met Lieu- 
tenant Gillespie, of the U. S. navy, who brought him instructions from 
his government to be prepared for the impending war with Mexico. 
Meantime the settlers in the Sacramento valley, believing that the 
Mexican authorities contemplated driving them out of the country, or- 
ganized themselves as a military force, a portion of which fell upon 
defenseless Sonoma on the morning of June 14th, and made prisoners of 
the commandant, General M. G. Vallejo, his brother, Captain Salvador 
Vallejo, Lieutenant-Colonel Victor Prudon, and Jacob P. Leese, whom 
they conveyed to Fort Sutter, where they were confined by order of 
Fremont, who now openly headed the revolt. The garrison left at So- 
noma, whose commander was William B. Ide, proclaimed California an 
independent republic, hoisting over the place the famous Bear flag. 
Fremont came there soon after and assumed command. On the 24th 
of June Captain Joaquin de la Torre, with fifty Californians, was de- 
feated at Olompali, between San Rafael and Petaluma, by a detachment 
of the Bear party under Ford, but succeeded in escaping. Affairs were 
in this state when Commodore J. D. Sloat, commanding the U. S. naval 
forces, with his bioad pennant on the frigate Savannah, who had 
learned at Mazatlan of the existence of war between his government 
and that of Mexico, hastened to Monterey, and on the 7th of July took 




ROBERT M. FITZGERALD, 
Grand Vice-President. 




HENRY LUNSTEDT, 
Grand Secretary. 



IS 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



possession of the place in the name of the United States. Commander 
Montgomery, who commanded the sloop-of-\var Portsmouth, hoisted 
the American flag over Verba Buena on the 9th of the same month. 
Orders were at the same time sent to Sonoma for the occupation of the 
place, and to Fort Sutter for the release of the Vallejos and other pris- 
oners. The occupation of California by the United States from Mon- 
terey northward was now accomplished. Fremont had raised a battal- 
ion, and with his men placed himself under the orders of Commodore 
Robert F. Stockton, who had succeeded Sloat as commander-in-chief. 
Shortly after the rest of the country was also occupied without opposi- 
tion on the part of the Californians. Small garrisons were placed at 
various points, the one at Los Angeles commanded by Gillespie. In 
September, 1S46, the Californians revolted in the South, and compelled 
Gillespie, and also the garrison at Santa Barbara, to retire. Imme- 
diately on the receipt of this news, Stockton organized a battalion, 
which, under Frthnont, was ordered to march southward. He himself 
went to San Diego in October with all the fleet but the Warren, whose 
commander, Hull, was appointed commandant of San Francisco. At 
San Diego nearly all the crew were landed; and the old town became a 
military post. At this time the revolted Californians had a few suc- 
cesses, — at San Pedro against Captain Mervine of the Savannah, at 
San Pascual against General Kearny, and at other points. But Stock- 
ton, when ready earl}' in January, 1847, an( i being impatient at receiv- 
ing no news from Fremont, marched upon Los Angeles, with Kearny 
in his company, defeated the Californians on the 8th and 9th on the 
river San Gabriel and on the Mesa, and triumphantly entered Los An- 
geles. The remnants of the defeated force capitulated to Fremont at 
San Fernando. This put an end to the war. The treaty of Guada- 
lupe Hidalgo, in 1848, confirmed the title of the United States 
to Alta California. After this Fremont was appointed by Stockton 
military governor, which gave umbrage to Kearny and led to serious 
disagreements between them. In March, 1847, a regiment arrived from 
New York, under the command of Colonel J. D. Stevenson, who is still 
living. Kearny for awhile held the command, and on his departure 
was succeeded by Colonel Mason, during whose incumbency gold 
was discovered. General Riley was Mason's successor, and in 1849 
issued a proclamation for the people to choose delegates to meet in con- 



vention at Monterey and form a constitution for the State of California. 
The constitution was passed in the same year; and a member of Con- 
gress and two senators were duly elected. These representatives, in 
due form, demanded of Congress the recognition of California as a 
State of the Union, which demand was soon acceded to; and the Presi- 
dent approved it on the 9th of September, 1850, a date forever held in 
grateful remembrance by all patriotic Californians. Among the popu- 
lation flocking into the State, there were not a few of the criminal 
class, who, taking advantage of the still unsettled condition of the 
country, committed outrages, rendering life and property unsafe. This 
was especially made manifest in the summer of 1849 by the so-called 
Hounds, who were seized, tried and punished by law, the citizens hav- 
ing armed themselves for that purpose. The good citizens in 1851 or- 
ganized themselves into vigilance committees, and in a short time 
nearly cleared the city and country of that bad element. In 1856, 
there having been a relapse of lawlessness, another vigilance committee 
came to the rescue of society in San Francisco and did good work. 
Since that time law and order have prevailed. 

In May, 1848, gold was discovered in the Sacramento valley, at 
Sutter's millrace. and made its appearance in San Francisco in the 
following month. From that time on the receipts of the metal 
from the Sacramento valley became very large; and the merchants 
did an immense business supplying the miners. In a short time, 
after the news of the gold discover} 1 spread over the Pacific Ocean, 
vessels laden with passengers and goods began to arrive, the 
first of them being from the Sandwich Islands; from other countries 
soon after. By the fall and winter of that year, and during 1S49, the 
arrivals were very large; and those of immigrants over the plains were 
also enormous, — all attracted to the country by the news of the discovery. 
Coin was scarce, and merchants found it very difficult to meet the 
duties at the custom-house. An arrangement was consequently made 
with the collector of the Port of San Francisco for him to receive gold 
dust at $10 an ounce, redeemable at the end of sixty days in United 
States coin. The most of the merchants were unable to carry out 
their agreement. The consequence was that the ore was sold by the 
government at public auction; and speculators bought it at $10, and 



THE" 




NINE MILLION MACHINE 
in USE in 1390 • 



IHPIifwi ^Machines 




C?lM^ltnilUQrOR AND AUTONiffIC 



h& 



(SINGLE THREAD.}* 



WJTH theirLATEST STYLE AmeHMENTS 

Wi UlXfO FI H ER-AND BETTER WORK. 

EASIER THAN -ANY OTHERS. 



theSinger Manufacturing Go. 

Pacific Coast Agency. gg p 0§T § T 2BET 

S AH FRANCISCO, Gal- 




£^> 




HENRY S. MARTIN, 
Grand Treasurer . 



! -1 




W. WALTER GREER, 
Grand Lecturer. 



20 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



even less. This was a great hardship on the business men of the 
town, because the government well knew the true value of the 
metal from an assay made at the mint in Philadelphia in the winter 
of 1S4S, from a lot of over $30,000 worth placed there by David Carter. 
The assay proved it to be worth from $18 to $20 an ounce. 

PAST AND PRESENT CONDITION OF CALIFORNIA COMPARED. 

The productions of California, before its occupation by the Amer- 
icans, were chiefly hides, tallow, and, to a moderate extent, pelts of 
fur-bearing animals. The vessels that came to the coast, as far back 
as the last } - ears of the Spanish domination, on a small scale, and to a 
greater extent since 1S22, were laden with such goods as the Califor- 
nian requirements demanded. They took the above-named articles in 
exchange; and the trade was mainly a barter operation. Some money 
was paid by the traders; but it did not form a leading part in the pur- 
chase of those few staple articles. 

The extensive plains were devoted to the grazing of cattle. There 
was but a small amount of cereals raised, merely sufficient for home 
consumption, and none, or at best very little, for export. The whole 
country was open to travelers, whose journeys were not retarded \>y 
fences. 

The land having been used only for raising horses, mules, cattle 
and sheep in enormous numbers for all previous years, the idea had 
become fixed in the minds of the people that it was not adapted to an- 
other purpose. The padres raised, in the valleys in which the missions 
were located, corn, wheat, oats, beans and other vegetables, sufficient 
for their own use, and demonstrated the utility of the soil for cultiva- 
tion. They raised enough grapes to supply themselves with a bounti- 
ful stock of pure, fine-flavored wines. In later years private persons 
made excellent wines, notably Louis Vignes, of Los Angeles. The 
people were happ3 r and contented, and were prosperous in their lim- 
ited way. Their wants were moderate, their homes were adobes, their 
ranches extensive, and their social relations were of the most amicable 
nature. They occasionally had, it is true, political disturbances; but 
these were usually unaccompanied with any considerable bloodshed. 

But a change came over this pastoral existence; and the hurry, 



bustle, energy and progressive spirit of an indomitable race over- 
ran the scenes of such quietude and simplicity of living. It came 
like a mighty torrent, and swept away, with its advancing measures, 
the people and the traces of their previous operations. It built roads 
and railroads; navigated with swift-sailing steamers the rivers and 
bays; built towns and cities; erected on the sites of the adobes pala- 
tial mansions, beautiful specimens of architectural skill and aesthetic 
attractiveness; established factories, warehouses and public buildings; 
broke up the soil of the plains and valleys with the plowshare, and 
produced on them acres of waving grain, orchards bending under pro- 
lific crops of luscious fruits; vineyards with choicest grapes, and wine- 
ries holding their thousands of gallons of "wine that maketh glad 
the heart of man." 

The magic wand that wrought this wondrous change was Gold ! 
The soil of certain portions of the State held it in nuggets, grains and 
dust, which, as we all know, enticed argonauts from all parts of the 
world to gather here and delve for fortunes that were awaiting active 
labor and arduous toil. From the advent of the goldseekers the 
progress of California has been without a parallel in the world's his- 
tory. She has risen from her extreme isolation to a prominence that 
equals that of the most prosperous of the other States of the Union. 
She aided the government in its hour of peril by disbursing her 
profusion of gold, and keeping up a coin circulation while paper cur- 
rency was in use elsewhere in the other States. 

The State has sent its graki in millions of tons during the past 
fifteen years to the markets of the world. It is supplying the most of 
the demand for citrus fruits and for raisins, and thus keeping within 
the Union the money heretofore sent to foreign producers for the same. 
It takes the lead in liberal, broad and extended education by the ability 
of its universities and its superior school s} - stem. In the schools the 
tuition is free to all; in the higher educational institutions the terms 
are so moderate that their teaching can be obtained by those whose 
means are limited. In science its studious citizens have gained honor 
and fame by their progressive advancement in the higher realms of 
observation and research. The liberality of one of its men of wealth 
has endowed an observatory that ranks in its appointments upon an 
equality with similar institutions in older States, and still older countries. 




JAMES I. BOLAND, 
Grand Orator. 




CHAS. L. TILDEN. 

Grand Marshal. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



In art, the delineations of its votaries, by pencil and chisel, have 
given to the world pictures and sculptures that receive a justly due 
commendation from capable critics. A well-merited meed of praise has 
also been awarded by lovers of art to California's sons and daughters, 
distinguished for their literary, histrionic and musical talents. 

In industrial pursuits the ingenuity of Californian inventors has 
made the task of cultivating thousands of acres more easy than, erst, 
that of a single hundred could be accomplished. They have greatly 
facilitated, and at the same time decreased, the cost attendant upon 
mining operations, and have effected similar results in the different 
manufactures within their territory. California has given to the world 
the new system of cable roads, which has augmented the speed and the 
comfort of the passengers in transit from one portion of the city to all 
others, and materially aided in the development of towns. These are 
but a few of the benefits she has already, in her youth, conferred upon 
the human race. What she will have accomplished in the years of her 
maturity would, if uttered now, seem like the visionary dreams of the 
wildest enthusiast. 

In the following brief summary of California's productions, a fore- 
sight into her possibilities may be partially, only, attained. Her rapid 
increase in producing and manufacturing, with but forty years to rise to 
the eminence she has acquired, may justify the warmest expectations 
that maj- be evolved from the consideration of the subject. 

The business transactions of San Francisco, in 1889, amounted to 
$251,562,403. The product of wheat in California, in 1889, was 42,- 
000,000 bushels. Her barley crop in the same year was 14,000,000 
bushels. The State's yield in gold and silver, in 1889, was $108,634,- 



755. The product of gold on the Pacific Coast since 1848 has been 
$1,985,617,695 ! The aggregated yield of gold and silver of the Pacific 
Slope in thirty-three years was $3,000,592,338 ! The State produced 
25,650 flasks of quicksilver in 1889. Her wool clip was, for the same 
year, 34,008,770 pounds, and the wine product 14,000,000 gallons. The 
exports of wheat and flour, expressed in wheat, in 1889, were 15,512,990 
centals; in thirty-three years the same were 276,308,641 centals. The 
domestic exports b}- sea, for the last eighteen years, of wheat, wool, 
wine, quicksilver, etc., were$587,i24,3io. Thedairy product of the State, 
in 1889, was, butter, 110,843 centals ; cheese, 42,424 centals; and eggs, 
2,652,133 dozen. The sugar imports in 1889 were 317,135,144 pounds; of 
foreign sugars, for the last twenty years, 2,520,615,108 pounds. Coffee 
imports, for 1889, were 20,272,586 pounds. Foreign rice imports, for 1889, 
were 46,603,676 pounds. Tea imports, for 1889, were 7,489, 2 16 pounds. 
The values of merchandise exports by sea, in 1889, were $47,274,097. 
The exports of merchandise and treasure, exclusive of merchandise by 
rail, in 1889, were $70,283,1 13. Value of manufactures in San Fran- 
cisco, in 1889, $246,411,972. 

The banking capital of the State is $55,000,000; and the bank 
resources are $246,411,972. 

The area of the State is 157,801 square miles, and her estimated 
population, in 1889, 1,465,000 souls. 

The above statistics, and many more could be added, are proofs 
positive of the wonderful resources which so young a State possesses ; 
and they give promise of a still more marvelous production before 
the close of the last year of this century ! 




SAX FKA*J€ IS-T4I, 



WENDELL EASTON president 



GEO W.FRINK. vice president. 



F.B.WILDE, secretary 




AGENCIES 
PACIFIC 60AST 

Land Bureau 

At Each County 5ea t . J 

IpsAngeles 

IANDBUMAU 
iSSANGELEJ.^ 



(A CORPORATION) 

%M]^ House and Insurance 






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S.t.Gott.W.flESTANDfORT St&. 

Los Angeles Gal 

J26 flFTH ST 

San Diego Gal 



AilET St.(°™ cehotel ) 

iRAN CISCO, GAL . SUB AGENCIES AT EACH COUNTY SEAT OF THE STATE . 



The Native Sons of the Golden West 



A CALIFORNIA SOCIETY. 



A HISTORY OF ITS ORGANIZATION; 

ITS PRINCIPLES AND PROGRESS. 



w. h. Mclaughlin, m. d., 

Mission Parlor, No. 38, N. S. G. W. 



X I /HE Order of the Native Sons of the Golden West, which to-day 
0) I [q sends its members from all parts of California to celebrate in a 
fitting manner the fortieth anniversary of the admission of their 
native State into the Union of States, owes its origin and progress to 
one of the strongest feelings implanted in the human breast, — pride 
of nativity, love for the place of birth. It is essentially and practically 
a California order, being confined to those born within the State. Its 
origin was patriotic, its purposes benevolent, its object to perpetuate 
the men and memories of "the days of '49," and to unite all native 
Californians in one harmonious bod}^. It owes no allegiance save 
where the stars and stripes shall ever wave. The burden of the pioneer 
founders has been taken up; and upon the foundation laid by them the 
Native Sons have erected a superstructure which to-day, in its rami- 
fications, includes every city and hamlet of importance in the State 
of California. From a beginning of twenty-one members fifteen years 
ago the 1 ith of last July, it now numbers over eight thousand of the 
bone and sinew of the land, honored in their native State and in 
the Order. Of those early architects of the Order it can be truly said, 
' ' They builded better than they knew. ' ' 



w 



CHAPTER I. 

OBJECTS OF THE ORDER. 

'HE object and aim of the Order of Native Sons of the Golden 
West is best told from the prefatory to its Constitution and 
By-Laws: 

"The society of the Native Sons of the Golden West was organized 
for the mutual benefit, mutual improvement and social intercourse of 
its members ; to perpetuate in the minds of all native Californians the 
memories of one of the most wonderful epochs in the world's history, — 
' the days of '49; ' to unite them in one harmonious body throughout 
the State by the ties of a friendship mutually beneficial to all, and 
unalloyed by the bitterness of religious or political differences, the 
discussion of which is most stringently forbidden in its meetings; to 
elevate and cultivate the mental faculties; to rejoice with one another 
in prosperity, and to extend the ' Good Samaritan ' hand in adversity. 
The members must bear a good reputation for sobriety and industry ; 
they must follow some respectable calling by which to make a living; 
and, as a vital principle of the association, it encourages temperance 
among its members, and recommends total abstinence from all intox- 
icating drinks." 



24 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST 



The Order of the Native Sons of the Golaen West is a secret society 
only so far as is necessary for the purpose of conducting its business 
affairs and the private relations of its members towards one another. 
In the secret part of its work there is nothing antagonistic to the 
scruples or conscientious opinions of the opponents of secret organ- 
izations. Its great principle is to " honor the builders of the Golden 
State," and to perpetuate the memory of their deeds; and, in addition 
to this, to instill into the minds of the sons of California a full and 
complete understanding of their relation and duty to the State, and to 
cultivate a spirit of friendship, brotherly love and harmony among 
them. 

The Grand Parlor was organized for the purpose of uniform 
administration of the privileges, honors and benefits of the Order; 
to perpetuate in the minds of all native Californians the memories of 
"the days of '49," and to unite all worthy Native Sons of California 
in one harmonious body; to improve the condition of its members by 
encouragement in business and in aiding them to obtain employment, 
and to extend to its members assistance in time of sickness and need. 
It has power over all Subordinate Parlors and to grant charters for the 
same, which it may revoke or suspend for proper cause ; of hearing 
and determining all appeals; to make governing laws for the Subor- 
dinate Parlors, and for furnishing all supplies necessary for the 
proper conduct of the business of the Order. 

The Constitution of the Order confines its membership to white 
males born in the State of California, and at least eighteen years of 
age ; but Subordinate Parlors may fix the limit of age over eighteen 
years. Candidates must be of sound health, of good moral character 
and industrious habits, having some respectable means of support, and 
believe in the existence of a Supreme Being. Application must be 
made in writing, signed by the applicant, stating time and place of 
birth, occupation and residence, and the applicant must be recom- 
mended by at least two members of the Order in good standing. The 
application is referred to a committee of three (3); and, if their report 
and the surgeon's certificate is favorable, the candidate is balloted for. 
The initiatory ceremonies are necessarily secret; but they are founded 
on and bear an allegorical reference to the history of California, and 
are calculated to impress the members with an idea of the importance 



to be attributed to the historical events that have made California what 
she is to-day. The principles of Friendship, Loyalty and Charity are 
enlarged upon, with the endeavor to instill into the members' 
minds the duty they owe to one another and to all worthy mankind. 
The amount of initiation fees and monthly dues of members varies in 
the different Parlors. The Constitution of Subordinate Parlors fixes the 
minimum of initiation fee at $5. In many of the Parlors it is as 
high as $10 and $20. The monthly dues and amount of sick benefits 
are optional with each Parlor. The dues are generally $1 per month, 
and the sick benefits from $7 to $10 per week. Every member in good 
standing, in case of sickness or bodily injury, not arising from any 
immoral or unlawful act, is entitled to receive from the funds of the 
Parlor of which he is a member such weekly benefits as their by-laws 
provide, but in no case less than $5 per week. In case of the death 
of a member, there is allowed such 'sum as the by-laws may provide 
for funeral expenses, generally $75. The growth and prosperity of the 
Order has been remarkable. It now numbers upwards of 8, 000 members, 
distributed in 163 Subordinate Parlors. During the year ending April 
1, 1890, the receipts amounted to $100,325.81; sick benefits were paid 
to the amount of $21,568.42, relieving 641 members; and there was 
cash on hand to the amount of $78,022.91, an average per member of 
$10.51. Taking into consideration that it is but the first generation of 
native Californians, there is every reason to be proud of this success. 
Inseparably linked with the destinies of the State, it will live to see 
California attain the full fruition of her power and greatness. 



CHAPTER II. 
EARLY ORGANIZATION. 

During the preparations incidental to the celebration of the 
Fourth of July, 1875, there appeared in the advertising columns 
of the daily press, on the morning of June 24th, an invitation to 
the native sons of San Francisco, over fourteen years of age, to meet 
in the Police Courtroom, Tuesday night, June 29th, and organize for 




H. G. W. DINKELSPIEL, 
Grand Inside Sentinel. 




BERTRAND RHINE. 
Grand Outside Sentinel. 



26 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



the purpose of taking part in the celebration of the national holiday. 
This public notice was the means of bringing together the young men 
who conceived and carried into execution the formation of the Order 
of the Native Sons of the Golden West. In accordance with the 
call, a small but enthusiastic body met and organized for the purpose 
of taking part in the parade, and further decided to perpetuate the 
organization under the name of the "Native Sons of the Golden 
State." A number of those present, who were under sixteen years 
of age, were debarred by vote from participating. Of this gathering, 
there were noted j 'esent : Myles F. O'Donnell, Chairman ; Louis Pat- 
rick, Secretary; james McDermott, Abraham Meyer, John Wilson, 
Walter Lovelaud, Chas. Olds, F. G. W. Fenn, Louis Harris, Raphael 
Pragen, Robert Aitken, James Bayliss, E. F. McKenna, E. Bloch, 
Broderick Temple, Geo. Winslow, John A. Steinbach. A vote of 
thanks was tendered to General Winn and Mr. Donovan. The meet- 
ing then adjourned to meet again in the Twelfth District Courtroom 
on July i, 1875. The minutes of the first meeting of the society were, 
at a meeting held October 7, 1875, corrected by the Executive Com- 
mittee to read as follows: " The first meeting was held in the Police 
Courtroom, and was called to order by General A. M. Winn, who 
briefly stated the objects and purposes of the meeting. He then 
offered the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted : 
' Resolved ; That the Natives of the Golden West will form an associ- 
ation to be known by that name and to be perpetuated on the Pacific 
Coast, and that we now appoint a committee to prepare a Constitution 
and By-Laws for such an institution; and, when ready to report, they 
shall call a public meeting of the Native Sons over seventeen years of 
age to consider and act on them.' " It was further carried to cross off 
four of the names, — it appearing that they had neither attended nor 
taken part in the proceedings the first night, but had joined at a subse- 
quent meeting held July 1, 1875. The names stricken off have been 
omitted in the preceding list. As a matter of fact, for the first two or 
three meetings there was a confusion of ideas and purposes, due in the 
main to the youth and inexperience of those participating. At this 
date, there were but 295 persons of California birth enrolled upon the 
Great Register of Voters for the city and county of San Francisco. 
It is not, therefore, a matter of surprise that the participants were few 



and inexperienced. A number were present whose names do not 
appear on the records. It has always been a matter of uncertainty as 
to who were present at the first meeting; but, as it was decided to allow 
none under sixteen years of age to take part in the proceedings, and 
as the records show that most of those present and in the parade were 
under sixteen years of age, it will readily be understood that amongst 
them were a number who subsequently joined the Order and are quali- 
fied to speak with a knowledge of this first meeting. The meetings 
held July 1st, 2d and 4th were important only in showing the spirit 
and patriotism of the attendants, and the businesslike manner in 
which the details of the coming celebration were managed. Mr. Henry 
R. Reed offered the use of a large silk American flag, to be carried by 
the Native Sons in the procession ; and amougst the insignia of a dis- 
banded club in a room in Anthony \s Hall was found a stuffed bear, a 
cub about three feet long, much dilapidated, but still a bear. This 
historic emblem was proudly paraded, decked in red, white and blue 
ribbons, and flanked by the American and Bear flags. 

Upon the occasion of this meeting, the 1st of July, 1875, General 
Winn said: "Mr. President and Members : This organization of 
young men, under the name of the Native Sons of the Golden State, 
is to become the future pioneers of California. Such men as James 
Lick and others are fast passing away ; and the rising generation 
will surely fill their places, and th N course adopted by you is one that 
I have long looked for among young Californians. As to the future 
of our State, never was there such an outlook know r n in the annals of 
history." The election of officers for the parade resulted in a choice 
of William Spear for Marshal ; Aids, John A. Steinbach and F. G. W. 
Fenn; Standard Bearers, James McDermott and Paul Harmon. The 
additional names of Paul Harmon, Harry Harmon, Nicholas Lacy, 
Horace Moore, John R. Matches, J. L. Mitchell, H. F. Owens, A. G. 
Hoffman, J. R. Elm, W. B. Upton, James Condon, Thos. Ford, William 
Josephi, Fred Streeper, O. A. Clegg, Jasper Fishbourne, W. N. Spear 
and F. W. Yale were added to the roll. H. F. Owens w T as elected 
Sergeant-at-Arms, and F. G. W. Fenn, Poet. Mr. Anthony offered 
the free use of his Hall for Sunday afternoons. John A. Steinbach 
and Paul Harmon procured a piece of canvas; and Harmon, being 
something of an amateur artist, painted upon it the rude picture of a 



— 


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EUGENE J. GREGORY, 
Chairman Board Grand Trustees. 




JNO. T. GREANY, 
Secretary Board Grand Trustees. 



28 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



bear, after a copy of the original Bear flag now in the possession of 
the Society of California Pioneers in this city. This flag is now the 
property of California Parlor, No. i, and is a most treasured relic. 
With the stuffed bear, it occupies a prominent place on the walls of 
the hall of the Parlor. 

THE FOURTH OF JULY, 1 875. 

On Monday, Jul}' 5, 1S75 (the 4th falling on Sunday), the Native 
Sons formed the Ninth Division of the procession, acting as escort 
to the children's decorated car. Many of them were attired in 
tattered miners' costumes, and carried on their shoulders the imple- 
ments of California's early industry, the pick and shovel. These, 
with the Bear flag and bear, have ever since been regarded as the 
emblems of the Order. There was hardly a difference of ten years 
between the ages of the oldest and youngest of the paraders. 
The line formed at eleven o'clock on Market, Mission and Howard 
streets, adjacent to Second street, and moved from the intersection of 
Second and Howard streets along the principal thoroughfares of the 
city to the corner of Seventh and Market, where the Grand Marshal, 
General John McComb, reviewed it and dismissed the divisions. The 
Natives marched to their hall, where an enjoyable time was had listen- 
ing to speeches and Mr. Fenn's poem. The boys made a commendable 
appearance as they marched in the parade, preceded by the stuffed 
bear gaily decorated and held aloft on a platform, flanked right and 
left by the American flag and their home-made Bear flag; and they 
were warmly and enthusiastically received along the march. 



THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 

The next meeting was held on Sunday, July 11, 1875; and from this 
meeting dates the entry of the Order into the ranks of patriotic, 
benevolent and fraternal societies. The name of the Native Sons of 
the Golden State was changed to the Native Sons of the Golden West, 
a Constitution and By-Laws adopted, and regular officers elected to 
hold office until the nth day of January, 1876. 



The officers elected and the members forming the Society were as 
follows : 

John A. Steinbach, President; born in San Francisco, October 21, 

l8 54- 

Jasper Fishbourne, First Vice-President ; born in San Francisco. 
May 5, 1852. 

F. G. W. Fenn, Second Vice-President ; born in San Francisco, 
January 30, 1854. 

S. P. Harmon, Third Vice-President ; born in Albany, Oregon, 
July 12, 1857. 

C. H. Smith, Recording Secretary ; born on Mount Diablo, October 
4, 1855. 

William L. Jones, Financial Secretary ; born at Mokelumne Hill, 
August 26, 1852. 

H. C. Stevenson, Treasurer; born at Tuolumne Hill, June is, 
1855- 

F. Streeper, Marshal; born at Mokelumne Hill, February 3, 1856. 

Executive Committee. 

John E. McDougald, born in El Dorado county, June 5, 1853. 
S. M. Stem wood, born in Sacramento, December 31, 1851. 
Myles F. O'Donnell, born in San Francisco, January 13, 1853. 
Abraham Mayer, born in San Francisco, November 12, 1854. 

Members. 

Henry F. Owens, born in San Francisco, July 19, 1859. 
William R. Connelly, born in San Francisco, June n, 1855. 
William M. Josephi, born in San Francisco, January 7, 1858. 
Oscar A. Clegg, born in San Francisco, May 30, 1856. 
William C. Miller, born in San Francisco, July 16, 1859. 
Ellis Bloch, born in San Francisco, February 23, 1859. 
Douis D. Patrick, born in Stockton, October 17, 1855. 
George Winslow, born in San Francisco, March 12, 1859. 
H. F. Harmon, born in Albany, Oregon, March 9, 1855. 




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WHEEEALEAFNEVEKD1ES IN THE STiaBLOOMING BOWERS. 
-AND THE BEE BANQUETS ON THRO' A WHOLE YEAR OF FLOWERS. 



FDR FURTHER INFORMATION. ADDRESS 




~TH|QUEEN OF AMERICAN WATERING PLACES AND 

'- - ' THEMOST ELEGANT SEASIDE ESTABLISHMENT IN THE WORLD. 



Geo. Schdnewald. manager 










J. H. TIBB1TTS. 
Past Giand Treaswter. 




HENRY HOGAN, 
Grand Trustee, 



30 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



The Constitution adopted then is as follows : 



CONSTITUTION. 
Article I. — Name and Objects. 

Section i. The name of this Association shall be Native Sons of 
the Golden West. 

Sec. 2. Its objects are social intercourse, mental improvement, 
mutual benefit, and general promotion of the interests of its mem- 
bers. 

Article II. — Members and Their Rights. 

Section r. Its active membership shall be confined to males over 
sixteen years of age, who were born in California, or west of the 
Sierra Nevada Mountains, after the 7th day of July, 1846, being the 
day on which Commodore Sloat raised the American flag in the city 
of Monterey. 

Sec. 2. Honorary members may be elected by unanimous vote of 
the members present at any regular meeting, for donations made, 
services rendered the Society, or for and in consideration of honorable 
distinction in the service of our country; and such members shall be 
entitled to attend the meetings and take part in discussions, but shall 
not be entitled to vote on any question. 

Sec. j. All candidates for active membership shall be elected by 
ball ballot, three black balls being sufficient to reject. If demanded, 
a second ballot may be had; but, if with similar result, the name shall 
not be presented again for six months. 



Article III. — The Election of Officers. 

Section 1. The officers shall be a President, three Vice-Presidents, 
a Recording Secretary, Financial Secretary, Treasurer, Marshal, and 
an Executive Committee of five, who shall be elected semi-annually 



by ballot and hold office until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. The thirteen officers shall constitute a Board of Trustees and 
manage the concerns of the Association, as required by the State laws 
and Company By-Laws. 

Article IV. — Officers' Powers and Duties. 

Section 1. The powers and duties of the officers shall be those inci- 
dent to their respective positions, and may be fixed and defined in 
B}'-Eaws passed by a majority vote of the members present at a regu- 
lar meeting, or a special one when called for that purpose. 

Sec. 2. By-Laws may be passed by majority vote to carry out the 
objects and provisions of the Constitution, which may be altered, 
amended or suspended at any regular meeting, by a two- thirds vote 
of those present; but suspensions shall only last for one meeting. 

Sec. 3. This Constitution may be amended by a two-thirds vote at 
a regular meeting, after the amendment has been proposed in writing 
and voted for by a majority at three separate and distinct meetings. 

Adopted in Convention of Native Sonjy of the Golden West, July 
11, 1875. 

J. A. Steinbach, President. 
Eouis D. Patrick, Secretary. 



BY-LAWS. 

Sections 1 to 10 of the By-Laws defined the duties of the various 
officers, and so completely that very little change has been made in 
them. Section 10 provided for monthly dues of one dollar. Those 
who refuse or fail to pay for six months shall stand suspended from 
all privileges in the Association, and shall not be reinstated while 
sick or disabled; but the dues of members may be remitted upon their 
inability to pay. Those in arrears for three months were denied the 
privileges of the floor in discussions. 




GEO A. McCAXVY. 
Grind Trustee. 




MORGAN. 
Grxmi Trustor- 



82 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



: i provided that weekly sick benefits of one dollar per day be 
paid all who are sick or disabled (after the first week's disability), the 
Society reserving the right to rid itself of any chronic burden by pay- 
ing the sum of one hundred dollars to the sick or disabled member. 
The President was empowered to appoint a Visiting Committee, whose 
duty it was to visit the sick as soon as such information was received. 

Sec. 12 provided that the funeral of members shall be attended to 
by the President, and that the Auditing Committee shall approve all 
accounts of the expenses of same. Any member failing to attend the 
funeral of a deceased brother was fined one dollar, unless good cause 
for their absence was shown at a regular meeting held within three 
months subsequent to the funeral. 

Sec. ij defined the procedure for trial of a member on charges, pre- 
ferred in writing, for any offense unbecoming a gentleman. The 
method of procedure is substantially the same as that now laid down 
in the Constitution of Subordinate Parlors. 

Resolutions. 

First. The members of the Society must bear a good reputation 
for sobriety and industry, and follow some reputable calling by which 
to make a living. 

Second. As a vital principle of this Society, we encourage tem- 
perance among its members, and recommend total abstinence from all 
intoxicating drinks. 

The following By-Laws to establish a library were also adopted : 

BY -TAWS. 

First. A library shall be established under such rules and regula- 
tions as the Trustees may adopt. 

Second. They shall receive, receipt for and return thanks to persons 
who may contribute money, books, maps, papers, etc., for that purpose. 

Third. The name of each contributor shall be entered in a well- 
bound book, to be kept for that purpose, showing the time, character 
and value of donations. 



Fourth. A Library Committee of five shall be appointed by the 
Trustees, who shall have special charge of that department, under the 
direction of the Society, and provide lectures at least once a month. 

General A. M. Winn, who conceived the idea of the formation of 
the Society, drafted the Constitution and By-Laws, afterwards organ- 
ized the Parliamentary School, serving for six months as its presiding 
officer, and lent invaluable aid to the youthful Society, was elected an 
honorary member. Gen. Winn and G. W. Anthony, elected September 
5, 1875, were the only honorary members elected in the Order. The 
amendment to the By-Laws, adopted August 15, 1875, providing that 
donations made for honorary membership shall not be less than one 
hundred dollars, which entitles the person to life membership without 
dues, together with Sec. 2 of Article II of the Constitution, providing 
for honorary membership other than the foregoing, was stricken out 
at a meeting of the Society held in Red Men's Hall April 26, 1876, 
G. W. Anthony resigning the same night. While marshal of the 4th 
of July parade in 1869, General Winn conceived the idea of parading 
young Californians, and advertised the time and place of meeting for 
them. They attended in large numbers, but were too young to 
appreciate organization. After perfecting the organization of the 
N. S. G. W., the enthusiasm of its members did not wane; and they 
went to work in a business manner to perfect their Society. Steinbach, 
McDougall and Smith were appointed a committee to prepare an 
initiatory ceremony and obligation, after the plan of other fraternal 
societies. The report of the committee was adopted, and all the 
members present took the obligation at the meeting held August 1 , 
1875. Provisions were also made for the care of the sick and burial 
of the dead. The first sick committee was appointed on the night 
of July 25, 1875, as was also the first 9th of September committee, 
to arrange for properly celebrating the admission of the State of 
California into the Union. An order of business was approved, and 
each member advised to procure and study a copy of Cushing's Manual. 
A badge of the seal of the State, in gold, on white satin, surrounded by 
a rosette of red, white and blue, was accepted. The guileless youths 
also appointed a special committee of two to suggest or hint to the 
young ladies the advisability of presenting a flag to the Society. 



standard 






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W. H. CHAMBERLAIN, 
General Chairman Joint Committee of Arrangements. 




W. H. METSON, 
Vice-Chairman Joint Committee. 



34 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



How well the committee succeeded in their diplomatic mission will be 
seen in the account of the Admission Day celebration of that year. 

The youthful Society thus early foreshadowed its future greatness 
by the adoption of a resolution providing for the organization of 
brandies in towns and cities west of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. 
Weekly meetings were held, and new members kept coming in. At the 
meeting of August 29, 1875, it was decided to parade on the 9th of 
September, with Alpine hat, with a star and feather, blue sash for 
privates. 

At this meeting F. G. W. Fenn presented the odes to be used in 
the opening and initiatory ceremonies. These continued in use in the 
Order until a recent date, in fact are used to-day, though slightly 
changed. 

Admission Day, September 9, 1875. 

The Society met at their hall on the morning of Sept ember the 9th, 
and, gaily appareled in their new regalias, with flags flying and old 
Bruin held proudly aloft leading the van, marched through the 
principal streets of the city, escorted by the French Zouaves out to 
Woodward's Gardens. The following was the programme of the day 
and evening: 



September 9, '75. 



Programme of Celebration. 



Met on Bush street one o'clock, escorted by French Zouaves. 

Band. 

Escort: French Zouaves. 

Officers of Day in carriages. 

Society. 

Bush to Kearny, to Washington, to Montgomery, to Market, to Sixth, 
to Mission, to Gardens. 



Evening Exercises. 

National Air, by Band. 

Opening Remarks, by President John A. Steinbach. 

Prayer: Rev. Dr. Woodridge. 

Music. 

Oration: Hon. R. Guy McClellan. 

Song: " Sword of Bunker Hill, " — Geo. B. Merriam. 

Music. 

Poem : F. G. W. Fenn. 

Song: " Ever of Thee," — Miss Linden (Music). 

Presentation of Silk Flag, by Miss Nellie Fenn, on behalf of the Native 
Daughters of California. 

Accepted by President. 

Salute to Flag, by Zouaves. 

" Star Spangled Banner, " — Rendered by the Native Daughters; Miss 
Carrie Lee, Pianist. 

Music. 

" Drake's Address to the American Flag," — Miss Ella F. Badger. 

Reading, by Professor Knowlton. 

Address: Gen. A. M. Winn. 

Music: " Red, White and Blue, " by the Band. 

Dancing. 



The silk flag presented by Miss Nellie Fenn on behalf of the Native 
Daughters of California was five feet wide and eight feet, four inches 
long, trimmed with gold and bullion fringe and heav3 T gold tassels. 
Miss Fenn said: "Mr. President: As a representative of the Native 






R. P. DOOLAN, 
General Secretary, and Secretary Reception Committee. 



J. P. DOCKERY, 
Treasurer of Joint Committee. 



P. G. DU PY, 

Chairman Auditing Committee. 



36 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



Daughters of California, I have the pleasure of presenting to you and 
your Association this beautiful silk flag, the emblem of our nation. 
As George Washington and his compatriots secured our freedom under 
its folds, we hope and trust that you will sustain our liberty so gal- 
lantly won. and cherish this stand of colors in time of peace for your 
patriotic amusement, and in time of war for our defense. Be valiant 
and faithful in the cause of right; and long may this banner wave. " 

John A. Steinbach, President, gracefully received the flag, and, 
waving it high above the heads of the audience, said: "Miss Fcnn and 
Native Daughters of the Golden West, Ladies: It is impossible for me 
to fully express the feelings of myself or the members of our Society 
for the honor conferred upon us in the presentation of this beautiful 
flag of our country-. No tyrannic rule can prosper under the Stars 
and Stripes. For nearly a century it has floated over our commerce 
in time of peace, and over our soldiers in time of war. It is the pride 
of every American patriot. Your efforts in our behalf will never be 
forgotten. We will cherish this precious gem in commemoration of 
them. Should our country call us to duty, we will be found under 
arms beneath the sanctified folds of this beautiful banner. At the 
celebration of the Fourth of July, Washington's Birthday and the 
Ninth of September this sacred emblem will be unfurled at the right 
of our line as a memento of this interesting event. Accept our thanks 
for this evidence of kindness, and for your anxiety manifested in our 
welfare. ' ' 

General A. M. Winn, in an eloquent speech, thanked the French 
Zouaves, referring to revolutionary times, and closing said: "Since 
then nearly a century has passed; and now, upon this far-off shore, 
you, as the proud representatives of the French nation, have kindly 
escorted the Native Sons of the Golden West in the celebration of the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of our admission into this United States. 
We can imagine with pleasure the spirits of Washington and La Fayette 
hovering over us with delight, witnessing their descendants honoring 
each other and linking together the emblems of their respective 
nations." 



Parliamentary School. 

At the meeting held October 7, 1875, the following By-Laws were 
adopted : 

Oct. 7, 1875. 

By-Laws to Organize Parliamentary School 
for the N. S. G. W. 

Section 1. Seeing the necessity to understand the rules that govern 
legislative and other deliberative assemblies, a class of members shall 
be formed for the study and discussion of Parliamentary Law. 

Sec. 2. The members of this Society, who enroll themselves for 
that purpose, shall be the only persons entitled to conduct, govern 
and control the school, and may pass rules for its government not 
inconsistent with the Constitution and By-Laws of this Society. 

Sec. 3. Each member shall provide himself with a copy of Cush- 
ing's Manual, from which he must, in connection with their special 
rules, sustain any position assumed or argument made in debate before 
the school. 

Sec. 4. This auxiliary of the Society shall be known as the 
" Parliamentary School of the N. S. G. W." and as such have power 
to elect such officers as they may deem necessary and proper to insure 
order in its proceedings. 

Sec. 5. As all expenses of the P. S. are to fall on its members only, 
it is distinctly understood that none of its accounts are to be presented 
to the Society for consideration or allowance. 

General Winn presided over the class for six months, during which 
time several of them had become very proficient in presiding and 
debate. John E. McDougald, whom General Winn described as "a 
young man, bright and intelligent, about twenty -two years of age," 
succeeded to the presidency, and ably conducted their deliberations up 
to the time the school dissolved. 

As early as September 16, 1875, the Society took action on an 
application from Nevada by resolving that, " We advise State organiz- 
ations, and unite by representation, and recommend the formation of 









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PARK BAND 

**» ORCHESTRA 



W*y^ Special. attenTio/I 

fijJHf/nro ORCHESTRA OR STRING MU6IC. %gp 






^ ** "mEWflMEOFTHEpARK BAND. 
ON AH INVITATION GOARANTEEj TOE BEST MUJIC 
IfcAT Q\N BE OBTAINED. 

office J-J.MAlUEaON, 

feOOM 138 PHELAN BOILDIN* BUSINESS MANAGER 
cSAN FRANCO CO. 




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/manufacturer of superior printers rollers &compq5it10n^ 
Insurance carried on all roller moulds. 



na&co, 



e^ESTA BLANGA SOUVENiaVlNTAGES. 




The First DrtriK. 



"The little one does not appear to be disgusted, to be sure; 
but then it is the good Cresta Blanca which makes the good .milk. 
Is it not so, Catherine?" 



Fac-simile of style of Labels 



Cresta Blanca Souvenir Vintages. 

HAUT SAUTERNE SOUVENIR 



Gold Medal Paris Exposition 1889 




CRESTA BLANCA, 



^&<ek 



tvtimcie, 



ileiM-cti, 



Brands Now Offered. 



Medoc Souvenir ... $12 00 

Table d'H6te Souvenir. . 6 00 

Margaux Souvenir 12 00 

Cote d'Or Souvenir 600 



Price Per Case. 

Quarts. Pints. 

$13 00 
7 00 
13 00 



Price per Case, 

Quarts. Pints. 

Chateau Yquetn Souvenir . $15 00 $16 00 

•Haut Sauterne Souvenir.. 12 00 ■ 1300 

Sauterne Souvenir 600 700 

Alto Douro Souvenir) ., ,„ 

Old Trousseau Port \"" ' 5 °° ,6 °° 




To tr\e Ladies : 

Souvenirs ano Regrets 




CHAS. F. CROCKER, 

Chairman Finance Committee. 




R. P. HAMMOND, Jr., 
Chairman Reception Commi 
Vice-chairman Finance Committee. 



88 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



Societies of Native Sons in all States and Territories, and that the 
Trustees be authorized to promote the same by furnishing printed 
copies of the Constitution, By-Laws and Ritual." 

The designation of the Society as a Parlor was made in September, 
1 875. The selection of the name at the time seemed to bear no further 
significance than to have something original, in contradistinction to 
lodge, chapter, etc., as used in other fraternal organizations ; though 
it is not unlikely it may have been suggested from the French parlcr, 
to speak, being applied in its primary sense to a place of meeting for 
the purposes of social conversation. 

The occurrence of the first President's twenty-first birthday on 
October 21, 1S75, was also the occasion of an enjoyable entertainment 
at Sander's Hall, where he was the recipient of- a handsome gavel, 
made of wood taken from the Kearsarge, and presented through him 
to the Society. This first social was a decided success. The rooms 
were tastefully decorated with emblematic designs, and an enjoyable 
time was had by all. After the first dance, First Vice President Fish- 
bourne presented President Steinbach with an elegant certificate of 
membership, gotten up for the occasion. President Steinbach, in 
reply to the presentation speech, took a hopeful view of the future of 
the Society. He said, after feelingly referring to the honors showered 
upon him : " Our Society is the beginning of an Order that will 
proudly wave its banner over more than half the territory of the 
United States, while its power and influence may control the destinies 
of the Golden West. We were born in a country of gold and silver, at 
a time when the world was looking for some great change; and when 
we presented it with more metals than the nations of the earth had 
ever seen before, with agricultural products in such quantity and 
quality as to astonish mankind, it is not to be wondered at that we 
are proud of the laud of our birth; and, when we consider that none but 
self-reliant, energetic families could get here at that early day, we are 
equally proud of our parentage." 

The remainder of President Steinbach's term was marked by the 
adoption of man3" wise and salutary measures, legislation that is to-day 
part of the Order's Constitution, and which has stood the test of time and 
criticism. The age of admission was changed, on the 18th of November, 
from sixteen to eighteen 3-ears, and, though subsequently changed for 



a short time to twenty years, has been a part of the Constitution of 
Subordinate Parlors for years, and is liable to remain so for an indefi- 
nite time. At the same meeting a declaration of principles, of which 
are appended some extracts, was also adopted : 

Declaration of Principles. 

The Society of the Native Sons was organized for social intercourse, 
mental improvement, and the mutual improvement of its members, 
and further proclaimed against any religious or political connections 
within the Order, and provided a penalty in case any member violated 
the principles of the Order. The initiation fee was fixed at two 
dollars, to take effect January 1, 1876. 

The success of the Native Sons of the Golden West, in San Fran- 
cisco, led to inquiries from Marysville and Stanislaus, relative to the 
formation of branches ; and it was resolved that, after the 7th of Jan- 
uary, 1876, the Society publish a pamphlet containing the Constitu- 
tion, By-Taws and Order of Business, together with the names, 
residences and occupations of all members of the Societ\\ 

The first semi-annual election of officers was held on the night of 
January 6, 1876, and resulted in the following selection : 

President, Jasper Fishbourne ; First Vice-President, H. C. Steven- 
son ; Second Vice-President, T. C. Bee ; Third Vice-President, F. W. 
Yale ; Recording Secretary, F. B. Marx; Financial Secretary, T. L. 
Stovall; Marshal, D. W. Whepley ; Treasurer, John H. Grady ; Sur- 
geon, B. T. Mouser ; Trustees : J. E. McDougald, H. Marx, G. W. 
Coffey, H. F. Harrison and E. A. Brackett. 

The Secretary reported an active membership of ninety-six, with 
cash on hand amounting to one hundred and thirty-two dollars and 
forty cents. The place of meeting was changed to Red Men's Hall, a 
new and commodious hall just completed, fronting Union Square, on 
Post street; and here the installation took place on Tuesday evening, 
January 13, 1876. Paul Harmon took the chair, President Steinbach 
acting as Installing Officer, who, on his appearing with the Installa- 
tion Committee, was welcomed with grand honors. He began with 
the Sentinels and closed by inducting the new President into the chair, 







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JO. D. SPKOUL, 
Grand Trustee. 




W. H. THORNI^EY, 
Grand Trust 



40 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST 



and presenting him with the gavel of authority. Each of the new 
officers made a short address. Chaplain F. G. W. Fenn (who a short 
time afterwards met an untimely death in the waters of the Russian 
river), robed in white regalia sat beneath a canopy, and on being 
called upon made a very feeling and appropriate address. 

Under President Fishbourne's administration the work went on ; and 
the Society grew in numbers and popularity. The many friends of the 
youthful organization showed their appreciation by numerous presenta- 
tions. At the meeting held on March 2, 1876, A. L. Bancroft & Co. pre- 
sented a magnificently bound copy of the Bible, which was received by a 
committee and placed upon the altar, and to-day occupies a like posi- 
tion in all Subordinate Parlors and at the deliberations of the Grand Par- 
lor. The night of February 3, 1876, was memorable by the presentation 
of the flag carried in their first Fourth of July parade. The presentation 
was made by Captain A. Gorley, on behalf of the legatees of Henry 
R. Reed. Captain Gorley presented the flag in a thrilling, patriotic 
speech. President Steinbach, in receiving the flag, referred feelingly 
to their earlier meetings, and to the kindness and encouragement 
received from the late Mr. Reed, and, turning to President Fishbourne, 
said : Mr. President : " I now have the pleasure of placing in your 
charge this cherished emblem of republican liberty. You, as Presi- 
deut, will deliver it to your successor, and so have it transmitted to 
the official guardians of the Native Sons of the Golden West." Presi- 
dent Fishbourne made an appropriate reply, after which speeches and 
varied entertainment kept the guests until a late hour. The Alta 
California had always been a warm and consistent supporter of the 
Society; and at the meeting on April 6, 1S76, in the presence of a 
large number of invited guests, General Winn, on behalf of Messrs. 
Fred'k MacCrellish and William A. Woodward, publishers and pro- 
prietors of the Alta California, presented the Society with its charter. 
After referring to the early history of the paper, and paying a glowing 
tribute to its proprietors, said : "The Alta was a true friend of the 
Native Sons before 30U organized ; and since then your proceedings 
have been regularly published and favorably noticed, thus giving you 
that prominence and notoriety so necessary for progressive advantage. 
Now that 3-ou have become a large and strong Association, they 
kindl3' print and present this elegant and novel charter. It is not the 



gift of king or potentate, but the free gift of a free people, sealed with 
the great golden seal of the Golden State, binding the people to respect 
and protect you in the rights and privileges therein expressed, thus 
making you one in name for ' social intercourse, mental improvement 
and mutual benefit. ' Nearly all of you were born since the Alta was 
established. In its columns some of you will find your births recorded, 
and your parents spoken of as brave and self-reliant pioneers. Way 
back to the building of Solomon's temple, organization was formed 
for a ' more perfect union;' fraternal organizations have followed on 
the same basis and made the world more desirable for social intercourse 
among men. In like manner, the ' Native Sons ' will take rank among 
the ruling social compacts of energetic, industrious civilization, and 
establish one of the most useful, powerful and glorious institutions the 
world has ever known or will ever know. " Ex-President Steinbach 
then presented a frame for the charter donated by General Winn. In 
his speech, referring to General Winn as the founder of the Society, 
and giving a short biographical sketch of his life, President Fish- 
bourne received the gifts for the Society, and expressed their thanks 
in fitting language. Pictures of General Winn and Daniel McLaren, 
as President and Secretary of the first Odd Fellows' Association which 
met in the State, were presented to the Society in the month of Febru- 
ary, together with a unique frame carved by F. V. Hart, a member of 
the Society. The design was a grapevine in full bearing running down 
the sides of the frame; and on the top of the frame, in lighter wood, 
was the figure of a bear, and at its bottom the figures 1S46-1876. 
This frame now incloses the charter of California Parlor, No. 1. 

In March, 1876, the Society was duly incorporated as The Native 
Sons of the Golden West, and legally entered upon its fraternal 
career. President Fishbourne was succeeded by John E. McDougald 
on July 13, 1876. The report of the retiring officers showed a mem- 
bership of 118, with cash on hand amounting to $184.79. The receipts 
of the term amounted to $584.54, the expenditures being $531.94. 

Under President McDougald 's guidance, the Order continued to 
prosper; and it was due in the main to his wise and conservative action 
that the Order was continued in the path marked out for it by its 
founders; for questions arose that at one time threatened to be very 
serious, growing out of the striking of the name of Gen. Winn from 




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SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST 



41 



the roll, and giving publicity to the fact that he was no longer a 
member of the Order. This action of the Society was due to a consti- 
tutional amendment, adopted April 26, 1876, prohibiting honorary 
membership. General Winn continued a warm friend of the Order 
of which he still considered himself a member. At his death the 
funeral was under the auspices of the Order. His resting place at 
Sacramento is marked by a massive granite monument erected by the 
N. S. G. W. The oil then applied to the ' ' troubled waters ' ' carried 
the Society smoothly and harmoniously on, and more strongly 
cemented its members in fraternal bonds. President McDougald early 
in his term advised the formation of branches in the city; but no 
definite action was taken to carry it into effect. 

The Fourth of July of that year was fittingly celebrated, the mem- 
bers then adopting the bear as their emblem and badge. They also 
paraded at the funeral of James Lick, adopted a design for a seal and 
took a benefit at the old California Theatre, which netted a handsome 
sum. At the close of the term the Society numbered 122 members, 
with cash on hand amounting to $303.61. 

D. W. Whepley succeeded to the presidency, and had a very suc- 
cessful term, leaving the treasury in a flourishing condition, there 
being over $1,000 on hand. 

President Whepley was succeeded July 5, 1877, by G. H. Fairchild; 
and it was during his term the Order met its first reverse and passed 
through dark financial days, which, however, were not sufficient to 
quell their ardor. It was on the 8th day of October, 1877, that the 
Pioneer Land and Loan Bank, of which J. C. Duncan was manager, 
suspended payment; and by that failure the Society lost the whole 
of its accumulated funds, amounting to $1,153. This disaster was 
the more felt in that on the same day Lyle Pitts, one of the members 
of the Society, was drowned in the Sacramento river; and the Society 
was at an expense of $200 in recovering his body and paying the 
subsequent funeral expenses, which had to be met by an assessment 
on its members. 

Up to December, 1877, the original San Francisco Society constituted 
the entire Order. On December 17, 1877, application was made by 
native Californians residing in Oakland; and. they were organized as a 
branch Parlor by the mother Society, under the name of Oakland Parlor, 



Nc. 2. This was followed by the inauguration of Parlor No. 3 at Sacra- 
mento on March 22, 1878. The institution of these branch Parlors ren- 
dered it necessary for the San Francisco Parlor to adopt some distinctive 
name; and it selected the name of Charter Parlor, No. 1, by which it was 
designated until June 1, 1878, when it adopted the name by which it has 
since been known, — California Pallor, No. 1. For some time afterwards 
each Parlor retained its individuality; and, though working under the 
same ritual and using the same ceremonies, each practically claimed 
entire independence. Although no serious difficulty arose from this con- 
dition of affairs, it was seen that, as the Order was extended, conditions 
would arise and circumstances demand a concert of action by which 
there should be some supreme governing power to make general laws for 
the regulation of all branches, and to which an appeal could be taken 
in cases of differences between Parlors or amongst their members. 
California Parlor, No. 1 , as charter Parlor, claimed this authority, but 
was without the power to enforce it. It was arranged to hold a con- 
ference of delegates, composed of five representatives from each Parlor, 
to meet at San Francisco, November 29, 1878. The delegates met and 
formed the first Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden West. 
The Grand Parlor has since convened annually; and the records of its 
proceedings furnish the further history of the Order. 



CHAPTER III. 

The Order Under the Grand Parlor. 

organization, legislation and extension 
throughout the state. 

The Grand Parlor is composed of all Past Grand Presidents re- 
taining a continuous membership in the Order, all Grand Officers of 
the expiring term, and all delegates duly elected by the various Sub- 
ordinate Parlors. All members of the Order in good standing are 
entitled to be present at its deliberations, and, by consent of three- 
fourths of the delegates present, be allowed to address the Grand 



42 



SOUVENTR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



Parlor. Each Parlor is entitled to one delegate at large, and one 
additional delegate for each one hundred members or fraction of one 
hundred members over fifty at the time of election. Delegates serve 
one year from the beginning of the session of the Grand Parlor to 
which they may be elected. The sessions of the Grand Parlor are 
held annually, beginning on the fourth Monday in April of each year. 
Special sessions may be called by the Grand President, upon the 
written petition of at least twenty-five Parlors, or by the direction of 
the regular session. The elective officers of the Grand Parlor are : 
ist, Grand President; 2d, Grand Vice-President; 3d, Grand Secretary; 
4th, Grand Treasurer; 5th, Grand Lecturer; 6th, Grand Orator; 7th, 
Grand Marshal; 8th, Grand Inside Sentinel; 9th, Grand Outside 
Sentinel; 10th, seven Grand Trustees. Upon the written application 
of not less than twenty qualified persons born within the State of 
California, and over eighteen years of age, to work as a Subordinate 
Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden West, under the jurisdiction 
of the Grand Parlor, the Board of Grand Officers may grant a charter, 
providing all the constitutional requirements have been fulfilled by 
the applicants. No Parlor can voluntarily surrender its charter so 
long as eleven members in good standing object. Upon the dissolu- 
tion of any Parlor, all moneys, books and other property must be 
immediately surrendered to the Grand Secretary. At the end of each 
semi-annual term, every Subordinate Parlor must report to the Grand 
Parlor the work and progress of the term, which includes all admis- 
sions, suspensions or expulsions; the number relieved, together with 
the amount of relief ; the amount of receipts and disbursements, the 
amount on hand, and the result of the election of officers. 

POWERS OF THE GRAND PARLOR. 

The Grand Parlor has jurisdiction over all Subordinate Parlors, 
with the right and power of granting charters to Subordinate Parlors 
only within the State of California ; of suspending or annulling the 
same for proper cause; of receiving, hearing and determining appeals 
from Subordinate Parlors and the members thereof ; of redressing and 
adjusting all grievances arising in the Grand or Subordinate Parlors ; 
to make laws for its government and support, and for the goverment 



and support of Subordinate Parlors ; to institute new Parlors only 
within the State of California; to initiate the members and install the 
officers of a new Parlor; to furnish supplies to Parlors, such as charter, 
ritual, odes, constitution and laws, blanks and forms, and such other 
articles as may be necessary to properly conduct the business of the 
Order. 

THE FIRST GRAND PARLOR. 

The first Grand Parlor met in the rooms of California Parlor, No. 1 
(then Charter Parlor, No. 1), on November 30th, 1878, and was com- 
posed of the following delegates, all of whom were present : 

Charter Parlor, No. 1. — Jasper Fishbourne, Benj. G. Worswick, 
Frank J. Higgins, John H. Grady, Henry Lunstedt. 

Oakland Parlor, No. 2.— Will G. Hawkett, W. A. Nash, Roderick 
W. Church, Homer L. Evans, J. W. Bankhead. 

Sacramento Parlor, No. 3. — H. Clay Chipman, H. W. Tajdor, 
J. W. Nixon, Geo. C. Kohler, Benjamin O'Neil. 

Benjamin G. Worswick, of Charter Parlor, No. 1, was called to the 
chair, and said that " while with our limited membership the forma- 
tion of a grand body might seem premature, yet the Charter Parlor 
had, for the sake of harmony and unity, cheerfully relinquished the 
authority of maternity, was entirely willing to vest the government of 
the Native Sons in a representative body, and was prepared to support 
such body with all the ardor that had distinguished its self-imposed 
labors of supervision. " Edwin L. Meyer acted as temporary Secretary, 
J. R. Carnell as temporary Marshal, and N. C. Brew as temporary Sen- 
tinel, all of whom were members of the Charter Parlor. The Grand 
Parlor then proceeded with the transaction of business, and organized 
by the election of H. Clay Chipman as temporary Chairman, W. G. 
Hawkett as temporary Secretary. One representative from each Parlor 
was appointed as a Committee on Organization, as follows: B. G. Wors- 
wick, R. W. Church, Benjamin O'Neil. The Committee reported 
as follows : "To the Officers and Members of the Grand Parlor, 
N. S. G. W. : We beg to recommend that the Grand Parlor proceed 
to elect officers to fill the following offices : Grand President, Deputy 
Grand President, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer, Grand Chaplain 
and Grand Marshal." The report of the committee was adopted, and 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



43 



the following officers elected: W. G. Hawkett, Grand President ; Ben- 
jamin 'Neil, Deputy Grand President ; II. W.Taylor, Grand Secre- 
tary; J. W. Bankhead, Grand Treasurer; George C. Kohler, Grand 
Chaplain, and W. A. Nash, Grand Marshal. The office of Grand 
Lecturer was created, and B. G. Worswick unanimously elected to fill 
it. The second day's session was held in Red Men's Hall; and the 
following committees were appointed by the Grand President : On 
Constitution and By-Taws— Delegates Taylor, Lunstedt and Nash; 
Seal — Fishbourne, Evans and Nixon; Ritual — Fishbourne, Hawkett 
and Kohler; Mileage and Expenses — Grady, Evans and O'Neil; 
Certificate of Membership— Fishbourne, Bankhead and Chipman. 
The next day's session was held in the Lick House, and the following 
standing committees appointed: Laws and Supervision— Worswick, 
Church and Chipman ; Returns and Credentials — Higgins, Nash and 
Kohler; Jurisdiction — Fishbourne, Bankhead and Taylor ; Cards and 
Regalia — Higgins, Evans and Kohler. The Grand Parlor continued 
in session for four days; and, although very little business of impor- 
tance was transacted, yet the foundation of the organic law of the 
Order was laid upon a basis that subsequent Grand Parlors have en- 
larged and strengthened. Charter Parlor, No. i, entertained the 
Grand Parlor at a banquet upon the conclusion of its deliberations; 
after which the Grand Parlor adjourned, to meet at Sacramento, June 2, 
1879. 

SECOND SESSION. 

The special session of the Grand Parlor, which was to have been 
held at Sacramento, was, by stipulation, announced to meet at San 
Francisco, June 10, 1879, where it duly assembled at Huddy's Hall at 
7.30 p. m. The delegates present were as follows: 

California Parlor, No. 1. — Jasper Fishbourne, John H. Grady, 
Frank J. Higgins, Henry Lunstedt, G. H. Fairchild. 

Oakland Parlor, No. 2.—W. A. Nash, J. J. Naegle, E. H. McMillan, 
J. W. Bankhead, Frank H. Tyler. 

Sacramento Parlor, No. 3. — Herbert W. Taylor, J. W. Nixon, Martin 
Coffey, J. P. McGinnis, John Barrett. 

San Fra?icisco Parlor, No. 4.—E. J. Smith, C. C. Morris, W. H. 
Firmin, R. B. West, H. Rodgers. 



Los Angeles Parlor, No. 5, was not represented. 

In the absence of the Grand President and Deputy Grand President, 
Jasper Fishbourne was elected temporary Grand President. The reports 
of the Grand President and Grand Secretary, together with their res- 
ignations, were received and accepted, and, on motion, all the offices 
of the Grand Parlor were declared vacant, and the following grand 
officers elected: Grand President, Jasper Fishbourne; Deputy Grand 
President, John Barrett; Grand Secretary, H. W. Taylor; Grand Lec- 
turer, Henry Lunstedt; Grand Treasurer, J. J. Naegle; Grand Chaplain, 
E.J. Smith; Grand Marshal, H. Rodgers. The Chair appointed the 
regular standing committees, and the Grand Parlor continued in 
session from day to day for six days, a large part of the time being 
devoted to considering the Constitution, and legislating for Subordinate 
Parlors. It was at the meeting held June 14, 1879, that the important 
legislation restricting membership to those born within the State of 
California was passed. Previous to this time all born west of the 
Sierra Nevada Mountains since 1846 were admitted. The original 
Parlor contained upon its roll the names of several who were born in 
Oregon; but it appears that at this date they had all severed their 
connection with the Order. The expenses of the Grand Parlor were 
paid by an assessment of $35 levied on each Parlor. There was no 
report of the individual financial standing of the different Parlors; but 
it is to be presumed that they were not very flourishing, as two of the 
Parlors (Oakland, No. 2, and San Francisco, No. 4) did not pay the 
assessment. The two Parlors added to the Order during this term 
(San Francisco, No. 4, and Los Angeles, No. 5) had but a short 
existence, the charter of San Francisco Parlor, No. 4, being annulled 
by the Charter Parlor; and that of Los Angeles Parlor was allowed to 
lapse. The names have since been placed on the Order's roster, with 
the numbers changed, and are to-day synonomous with thrift and 
fraternal progress. 

THIRD SESSION. 

The third session of the Grand Parlor was held in San Francisco, 
June 1, 1880. During the previous 3 r ear, the very difficulties that had 
been foreseen arose. Internal troubles in San Francisco Parlor, No. 4, 
rendered necessary that some extraneous authority should be exerted. 



44 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



California Parlor, No. i, assumed the authority of the Grand Parlor, 
and annulled the charter. At this meeting of the Grand Parlor both 
the Grand President and Deputy Grand President were absent. The 
Grand Parlor filled the office of President temporarily by electing 
Prank D. Ryan, of Sacramento Parlor, No. 3. The only grand officers 
present were Grand Lecturer H. Lunstedt and Grand Secretary II. W. 
Taylor. The Grand President filled the chairs temporarily by appointing 
as Deputy Grand President, W. A. Nash, of Oakland Parlor, No. 2; 
Grand Treasurer, J. R. Carnell, of California Parlor, No. 1; Grand 
Chaplain, Frank J. Higgins, of California Parlor, No. 1; Grand Mar- 
shal, H. Clay Chipman, of Sacramento Parlor, No. 3. Los Angeles 
Parlor, No. 5, owing to its distance and the inability of any of its 
members to absent themselves from their business a sufficient length 
of time, was not represented, but sent a communication that it would 
nevertheless consider itself bound by the action of the Grand Parlor. 
It was at this session that real important work began; and the members 
realized that their society had objects and purposes that were destined 
to leave footprints upon the sands of California's history. One of the 
most important acts of the session was the action taken upon the 
report of the committee of the previous session relative to the incor- 
poration of the Grand Parlor. The committee's report was adopted, 
and the certificate of incorporation was filed with the County Clerk of 
San Francisco county and the Secretary of State ; and thus the Grand 
Parlor became a properly constituted corporate body in law. 

To settle any question that might arise as to the previous action of 
California Parlor, No. 1, before alluded to, the Graud Parlor adopted 
the following resolution : 

Whereas, The Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden 
West, in session assembled this the third day of June, 1880, having 
received authority from California Parlor, No. 1, to assume jurisdiction 
over all Parlors of the Order at present in existence, and which may 
hereafter be established, said California, No. 1, being the Charter 
Parlor, and having heretofore had all the privileges and powers now 
vested in the Grand Parlor, be it 

Resolved, That the Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden 
West hereby ratify all official acts of California Parlor, No. 1 : and be 
it further 



Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the 
minutes of this session of the Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of the 
Golden West. 

At this session of the Grand Parlor, a complete Constitution for 
the Grand Parlor and Subordinate Parlors was adopted; and during 
the year three new Parlors were organized, namely: Marysville Parlor, 
No. 6; Stockton Parlor, No. 7; and Argonaut Parlor, No. 8. The 
Grand Parlor selected the following officers : Grand President, F. J. 
Higgins; Deputy Grand President, F. D. Ryan; Grand Secretary, 
Henry Lunstedt; Grand Treasurer, J. J. E. Cordes; Grand Marshal, 
H. Clay Chipman; Grand Chaplain, F. G. Wisker; Grand Lecturer, 
Wm. A. Nash. The Grand Parlor was very fortunate in its choice of 
officers. The Grand President, Frank J. Higgins, was an earnest and 
faithful worker, deeply imbued with a sense of the benefits to be de- 
rived from association, and with a desire to extend the Order 's in- 
fluence. The Grand Secretary, Henry Lunstedt, had been associated 
with the Order almost from the time of its inception, having joined 
on the 30th of September, 1875, and from the first taken a deep 
interest in the Order's welfare. He brought to the discharge of his 
duties more than ordinary executive ability; and, as a mark of the 
esteem and friendship in which he is held by the members of ihe 
Order, he has been since (with the exception of the years 1882 and 
1883) continued in the office. It is safe to say that no fraternal order 
in the State can boast of a more efficient Grand Secretary. 

FOURTH SESSION. 

The fourth annual session of the Grand Parlor convened at Oak- 
land, June 7, 1881, Grand President Frank J. Higgins presiding. The 
following delegates were present: 

California Parlor, No. 1. — A. C. Lutgens, John H. Grady, Henry 
Lunstedt, Ernest G. Du Py. 

Oakland Parlor, No. 2. — Henry Trevor, Joseph Becht, John J. 
Naegle. 

Sacramento Parlor, No. j. — H. Clay Chipman, C. E. Parker, W. 
Shields, E. F. Cohen. . 







4 FOR T/4ROfe)QH JOlrtT \\tAt. 

Excursion Tickets 

f C^AJ^EDUCED RATE^^fARE, 
AnO P(fR. ALL.OW&< INFORMATION , 
ADDRESS B/. TfclEORARA ORafcTTtR 
""■-^ c ORE£#UIR£ \tf PER5&TH0" TNE 
TOCRI6T TICKET Or~MCt, 



The Dancing HcadBrau or Rufus E. Lqyb 

A member of the N. S. G. W., is here represented, also a portrait of Mr. Love. His 
Main Academy is at Irving: Hall, 139 Post St., San Francisco, 

where classes for Ladies and Gentlemen meet on Monday and Thursday evenings at 7.30. 
Juveniles, Wednesday and Saturday afternoons at 2.30. 

Mr. Love's Branch Academy is at Saratoga Hall, 814 Geary Street. 
Ladies and Gentlemen meet on Wednesday and Friday evenings at 7.30. 



6\r) MARKET STREET 

^ V WDE* GRAND *OTEL, 5^ T~^ANCI6CO 

5AM MILLER, Oena^AL Tou^ur Aca/ir. 



Cal. 







Mrs. Love holds classes on Monday and Thursday afternoons at 2.30, for the instruction 
of young ladies who cannot attend the evening classes, and who are troubled with the 
timidity natural to beginners. 

Young ladies should take advantage of this opportunity. 

Mrs. Love holds classes for juveniles in Ballroom and Fancy Dancing, on Wednesday 

and Saturday afternoons at 2.30. 

♦ » 

Dancing ought to form a part of the physical education of children, not only for their 
better health, but to counteract the many vicious attitudes and habits which they too often 
contract. 

All the latest Fancy Dances taught. 

Due care will be exercised in the admission of pupils to my academy. 

Special rates to Clubs of 3 or more. 

PRIVATE LESSONS ANY DAY OR HOI. 



%I£ ALSO TAKE- PLEASURE IN PRESENTING THE" PORTRAITS OP THE WELL KNOWN MERCHANT TAILORS. A.BLOCK &V*VANKOW5KI. 




|^ OF %^ 




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'■ Hh - ~^~=r= H 



SH^o/ifii^ foKEiQN Goods. 

qs\ carejirll/ 3%cfed Stock of Woolen Goods 
ip the barker® 



Hl&lISflonllorocryS^ jj^ Fresco, 

Opp. OCCIDENX4LTHOTEL. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



45 



Marysville Parlor, No. 6. — G. B. Baldwin, J. C. Venter, W. J. 
Andrews. 

Stockton Parlor, No. y.— S. L. Terry, Geo. C. Israel, H. J. Corcoran. 

Argonaut Parlor, No. 8.— A. F. Jones, M. Green, D. W. Wasley. 

The officers elected for the ensuing term were: Grand President, H. 
Clay Chipman; Deputy Grand President, George B. Baldwin; Grand 
Secretary, Henry Lunstedt; Grand Treasurer, Joseph Becht; Grand 
Marshal, E. F. Cohen (subsequently resigned and Sanil. L. Terry, of 
Stockton Parlor, elected); Grand Lecturer, A. F. Jones. The Grand 
President also appointed W. J. Andrews, Grand Outside Sentinel, and 
J. J. Naegle, Grand Inside Sentinel. The Grand Secretary read the 
records of the Board of Grand Officers since the last annual session, 
which were approved, together with all acts of the Grand Officers. 
The report of the Grand Secretary showed six Parlors in good stand- 
ing, three of which — Marysville, No. 6, Stockton, No. 7, and Argo- 
naut, No. 8 — were instituted during the term just closed. Los 
Angeles Parlor, No. 5, had voluntarily dissolved, it having only a 
nominal membership of eighteen. The death of one delegate, J. R. 
Carnell, was announced; and the following statistics were submitted: 
Number of members January 1, 1880, 154; June 7, 1881, 272; initiated 
from January, 1880, to January, 1881, 96; reinstated, 8; withdrawn by 
card, 3; expelled, 9; suspended, 34; resigned, 6; deceased, 2; number 
of members January 1, 1881, 208; increase of membership from 
January 1, 1880, to January 1, 1881, 54. Amount of cash received, 
$1,591.90, by Parlors; amount of cash disbursed, $1,300, by Parlors. 
Of the disbursements, $328 went for benefits and funeral expenses. 
The receipts of the Grand Parlor were $246.50; the disbursements 
of the Grand Parlor were $139.65. The Grand Treasurer reported 
$136.55 on hand. A committee, consisting of Jones, Lunstedt and 
Naegle, telegraphed the following greeting to the Pioneers in session 
at San Jose: 

Oakland, June 8, 1881. 
The Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden West in con- 
vention assembled, to the Pioneers of the State of California 
now assembled, send greetings: 

We, the Sons of the Golden State, who see daily manifested 
the tokens of stability and substantial improvement which assures 



us that the sister of the many children of the Union who sprang 
into existence full-armed, like Minerva of old, and disdained terri- 
torial probation, will in the future maintain the glorious prosperity 
given her by the unselfish energy of our fathers, wish you a long 
life, joy and prosperity. We to-day exist by the traditions of your 
glorious past; but you live in that past made present by your re- 
unions, and the strong ties of fellowship which memory, the most 
gracious gift of the Supreme Being to man, will never allow to be 
broken . 

We, therefore, with due respect to our elders, join you in the 
spirit of your festivities, and trust that the good will of your Order 
will be with our successful institution. 

Our congratulation is not local, but extends from Butte on the 
north to Los Angeles on the south; but from one and all the greeting 
is equally fervent. 

May our State ever prosper, and move onward and upward among 
the many stars which compose the firmament of our Union, in which 
the principles of self-government have, for the first time, been suc- 
cessfully demonstrated. 

By Order of the Grand Parlor, N. S. G. W. 



A. F. Jones, 
J. J. Naegle, 
Henry Lunstedt, 



Committee. 



Committees on Finance, Returns, Appeals and Grievances, Pe- 
titions, State of the Order, Legislation, Printing and Supplies, and 
Laws and Supervision, were appointed by the Grand President. 

Many constitutional amendments were adopted. The Grand 
Parlor was defined as composed of all Past Grand Presidents and 
delegates duly elected by Subordinate Parlors. The Grand Chaplain's 
duties were assumed by the Past Grand President. A ritual was 
adopted, together with instituting and installation ceremonies for both 
the Grand Parlor and Subordinate Parlors. The application for a 
charter from Tombstone, Arizona, was rejected on the ground that 
the Grand Parlor had not the authority, under its articles of incor- 
poration, to grant a charter. The eligibility of members to the Presi- 
dency of Parlors was limited to those who had served a term, or part 



46 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



of a term, as a Vice-President; provided, that if all qualified members 
declined, any member in good standing may be elected. A quarterly 
per capita tax of twenty-five cents per member was levied upon all 
Parlors for the support of the Grand Parlor. The Grand Parlor, after 
a three-day's session, adjourned, to meet at Sacramento, June 6, 1882. 

FIFTH SESSION. 

The fifth session of the Grand Parlor, which convened at Pioneer 
Hall, Sacramento, Tuesday, June 6, 1882, marked the beginning of 
the prosperous career which the Order's financial and numerical 
strength to-day discloses. 

Nine Parlors were represented; the delegates present were: 

California Parlor, No. 1. — P. G. P. Frank J. Higgins, Henry 
Lunstedt, John E. McDougald, John H. Grady, G. H. Fairchild, F. G. 
Wisker, Edwin L. Meyer. 

Oakland Parlor, No. 2. — John J. Naegle, Henry Trevor, C. F. 
Mc Williams. 

Sacramento Parlor, No. 3. — Grand President H. Clay Chipman, 
F. B. Houston, C. N. Post, Frank D. Ryan, R. T. Devlin, John T. 
Stafford. 

Marysville Parlor, No. 6.— Will M. Clark, M. F. Brown, J. H. 
Shaffer, C. J. Becker. 

Argonaut Parlor, No. 8. — A. F. Jones, A. L. Van Mater, D. W. 
Wasley. 

Placerville Parlor, No. 9. — R. Alderson, Jr., Geo. Hofmeister, C. R. 
Brewster. 

Pacific Parlor, No. 10. — John A. Steinbach, M. A. Dorn, Wm. 
Metzner, Chas. L. Weller, Jr., Wm. J. Gavigan. 

Modesto Parlor, No. 11.— John W. McCarthy, L. C. Branch, J. S. 
Williams. 

Eureka Parlor, No. 13.— F. W. Voile, P. Van Maren, John Doran. 

Stockton Parlor, No. 7, and Lassen Parlor, No. 12, were not rep- 
resented. 

The report of Grand President Chipman reviewed the progress of 
the term. He informed the Grand Parlor that the membership of the 
Order had doubled, and concluding said: " Never before was there so 



much enthusiasm in the Order as now; never was its future so bright; 
and may a kind Providence direct wisely our councils, and inspire 
the heart of every member of our beloved Order with a feeling of 
affection for his brother. ' ' 

Grand Secretary Henry Lunstedt reported that five new Parlors 
had been instituted: Placerville Parlor, No. 9; Pacific Parlor, No. 10, 
San Francisco; Modesto Parlor, No. 11; Lassen Parlor, No. 12; and 
Eureka Parlor, No. 13. The membership of the Order had increased 
during the year from 272 to 625. The receipts of the Order amounted 
to $3,725.63; the disbursements (of which $421 was paid for benefits), 
$2,679.59. Altogether, the Parlors were in a decidedly healthy finan- 
cial condition. The report of Grand Treasurer Joseph Becht gave the 
gross receipts of the Grand Parlor as $636.30; disbursements, $237.75; 
cash on hand, $298.55. The successful celebration of Admission Day 
at Marysville the previous year was the means of bringing the Order 
prominently before the public,' and of inducing young Californians to 
become members. The Committee on Legislation, M. A. Dorn, Chair- 
man, and the Committee on Laws and Supervision, John A. Steinbach, 
Chairman, made a thorough revision of the Constitution. Among the 
many changes, the most important were: The change of the minimum 
age of admission from eighteen to twenty years, to go into effect Jan- 
uary 1, 1883 (changed the next session to eighteen years, where it has 
since remained) ; apportionment of delegates changed to one at large, 
and one additional delegate for each seventy-five members or fraction 
of seventy-five over twenty-five for each Parlor; no proxies allowed, 
but each Parlor may elect alternates; the date of meeting was fixed 
as the second Monday in April of each year; the duties of the Grand 
Lecturer were for the first time defined. The Ritual Committee, A. F. 
Jones, Chairman, reported a completed ritual, which was adopted and 
declared the ritual of the Order, to go into effect September 9, 1882. 
A quarterly per capita tax of twenty-five cents each on all members of 
the Ordef was levied. The qualification for membership in the Order 
was limited to those born within the State of California since the 7th 
day of July, 1846. To meet the expense of the delegates to the Grand 
Parlor, two classes of warrants were drawn, — one for traveling ex- 
penses, payable immediately, the second class payable on or after the 
1st day of July, 1882. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



47 



Sacramento Parlor, No. 3, entertained the delegates at an enter- 
tainment and ball, which was the social event of the season at the 
Capital City. 

The following officers were elected and installed for the ensuing 
term: Past Grand President, H. C. Chipman; Grand President, John 
H. Grady; Deputy Grand President, George Hofmeister ; Grand 
Secretary, C. L. Weller, Jr.; Grand Treasurer, Will M. Clark; Grand 
Marshal, C. F. Mc Williams; Grand Lecturer, L. C. Branch. The 
Grand President appointed Grand Inside Sentinel, A. L. Van Mater; 
Grand Outside Sentinel, F. G. Wisker. 

After a successful and harmonious session of three days, the 
Grand Parlor adjourned, to meet at San Francisco the second Monday 
in April, 1883. 

SIXTH SESSION. 

The sixth session of the Grand Parlor convened at Red Men's 
Hall, San Francisco, April 9, 1883, Grand President John H. Grady in 
the chair. The chairs of absent officers were filled temporarily by the 
Grand President. The deliberations were opened by a few well- 
chosen remarks by Grand President Grady; prayer was offered by 
Acting Past Grand President A. F. Jones; and Grand Marshal 
McCarthy declared the Grand Parlor in session and ready for business. 
The Committee on Credentials, Jones, Chairman, reported the follow- 
ing delegates duly accredited: 

California Parlor, No. /.—Grand President John H. Grady, F. G. 
Wisker, Henry Lunstedt (alternate for J. E. McDougald), Chas. W. 
Decker and Peter F. Dunne. 

Oakland Parlor, No. 2. — Henry Trevor, H. W. Taylor. 

Sacramento Parlor, No. 3. — F. B. Houston, C. E. Parker, J. W. 
Reynolds. 

Marysville Parlor, No. 6. — F. H. Greely, C. J. Becker. 

Stockton Parlor, No. 7. — C. H. Lindley, H. J. Corcoran. 

Argonaut Parlor, No. 8. — A. F. Jones, C. E. Kusel. 

Placervi lie Parlor. No. 9. — Richard Alderson, Jr., C. R. Brewster. 

Pacific Parlor, No 10.— J. A. Steinbach, M. A. Dorn, G. A. Young. 

Modesto Parlor, No. ji.—L,. C. Branch, C. F. McCarthv. 

Humboldt Parlor, No. 14.— H. L. Hicks, H. H. Buhne' 



The Grand President filled the vacancies on standing committees, 
and submitted his report to the Grand Parlor. He reported three new 
Parlors as having been instituted during the year, — Humboldt, No. 14; 
Mount Lassen, No. 15; and Fremont, No. 16; and the reorganization 
of Stockton Parlor, No. 7. A gain of 271 members was reported, 
making the total membership 694. The finances of the Order were 
reported to be in a healthy condition, there being $3,257.30 in the 
treasuries of the Subordinate Parlors. An application from native 
Californians resident in Tombstone, Arizona Territory, was reported; 
and the Grand President advised organizing Parlors wherever a suffi- 
cient number of native Californians warranted permanency. Several 
appeals from the decisions of Subordinate Parlors were submitted and 
decided by the Grand President, who took occasion to point out the 
crudeness and ambiguity of the Constitution, there being no law to 
cover most of the appeals. Grand President Grady had given much 
thought to constitutional law, and recommended many important 
changes, which were adopted by the Grand Parlor. Grand Secretary 
Weller reported charters issued to three Parlors. The financial part of 
his report showed the sum of $6,287.44 on hand in the various Parlors. 
During the year $1,153 had been paid out in sick benefits to the 
members. Grand Treasurer Will M. Clark reported receipts of Grand 
Parlor, $830.50; expenditures, $522.25; cash on hand, $308.25. The 
proposition to change the word "Parlor" wherever found in the 
Constitution to ' ' Lodge, ' ' and also changing the words ' ' Native Sons 
of the Golden West "to " Native Sons of California, " was voted down 
by a large majority vote. The Constitution was amended, allowing the 
Grand President to appoint, within thirty days after adjournment, as 
many District Deputy Grand Presidents as, in his judgment, he may 
deem advisable, they to have power to organize Parlors and install 
officers, etc. Stockton was selected as the place of celebration for the 
coming 9th of September. The title of Deputy Grand President was 
changed to Grand Vice-President. The following officers were elected 
and installed : Past Grand President, John H. Grady, of California 
Parlor, No. 1 ; Grand President, A. F. Jones, Argonaut Parlor, No. 8; 
Deputy Grand President, John A. Steinbach, Pacific Parlor, No. 10; 
Grand Secretary, C. E. Parker, Sacramento Parlor, No. 3; Grand 
Treasurer, Chas. W. Decker, California Parlor, No. 1 ; Grand Marshal, 



*8 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



C. H. I.iudley, vStockton Parlor, No. 7; Grand Lecturer, M. A. Dorn, 
Pacific Parlor, No. 10. Grand President Jones appointed F. G. Wisker, 
(ii and Inside Sentinel, and John Hill, Grand Outside Sentinel. After 
four days deliberation, the Grand Parlor adjourned, to meet at Marys- 
ville the second Monday in April, 1884. 

SEVENTH SESSION. 

The seventh annual convention of the Grand Parlor met at Marys- 
ville, April 14, 1S84, Grand President A. F. Jones presiding. The 
credentials of delegates from twenty-three Parlors were reported favor- 
ably on by the Committee on Credentials. The Grand President, in 
his annual report, congratulated the Order upon its substantial growth. 
Thirteen Parlors were organized during the year, and the membership 
of the Order increased to 1,248. Applications for charters were reported 
from Virginia City, Nev., and Seattle, W. T., with a recommendation 
that they be granted. The Grand President had thoroughly districted 
the State; and to the energy of the district deputies appointed, and the 
successful previous 9th of September celebration held at Stockton, the 
great prosperity of the Order was attributed. Referring to the death 
of General A. M. Winn, the Grand President said: "Among the names 
of those of California's honored pioneers who have passed to their 
eternal homes during the last year, I find that of General A. M. Winn. 
While the news of his death touched the chords of sorrow and sym- 
pathy in many fraternal organizations and human hearts, they echoed 
nowhere with a deeper and more lasting strain than in this, our young 
Order, where the memory of that paternal solicitude which guarded 
our infancy through to manhood's strength will ever be cherished. 
He was buried by Sacramento Parlor, No. 3, at the request of his 
relatives and the grand officers." 

Oakland Parlor, No. 2, was announced as having forfeited its 
charter; and Fremont Parlor, of San Francisco, had received no official 
communication or recognition, no cause being given for its demise. 
Many of the Deputy Grand Presidents made elaborate reports, showing 
a large increase of membership and in the number of Parlors, and an 
enthusiastic feeling throughout the Order for extending its limits and 
elevating the standard to the highest requirements of the principles set 



forth for the guidance of its members. Grand Secretary*C. E. Parker 
resigned August 19, 1883; after which E. F. Cohn, of Sacramento 
Parlor, acted as Secretary till September 10, 1883, when the grand 
officers appointed F. B. Houston to that position. Owing to the 
various changes in the officers and the lack of data from his prede- 
cessors, the report of the Grand Secretary was not as complete or as 
elaborate as had been the reports of previous Grand Secretaries. The 
membership was reported to have increased from 696 to 1,248 members. 
No statistics were given as to the standing of the several Parlors. 
Grand Treasurer C. W. Decker reported the sum of $555.02 on hand. 
The deliberations of the Grand Parlor occupied four days; and much 
important business was transacted, of which space will only admit a 
general reference. The most important were the creating of the office 
of Grand Orator, and defining the duties of that officer; also particular- 
izing the duties of the Grand Secretary and the Grand Lecturer. A 
salary of $150 per annum was attached to the office of Grand Secretary, 
provided that officer was prompt in submitting his annual report to 
the Grand Parlor. The question of ritual took up the usual time, 
with the usual unsatisfactory result. On motion of Sexton , Subordinate 
Parlors were granted the right to organize drill corps; and the proper 
equipment was described. Pryor and Grady introduced a resolution, 
which was adopted, providing for an endowment system in the Native- 
Sons. It was referred to a special committee of five, composed of 
Pryor, Grady, Lawrence, Chipman and Tibbitts, who submitted an 
elaborate report at the following session of the Grand Parlor; but no 
action was taken on the report other than to lay it over for one year. 
Brunner, Decker and Ostrander were appointed a committee on certifi- 
cate of membership, and were given full power, subject to the approval 
of the grand officers, to have drafted and engraved one hundred certifi- 
cates, at a cost not to exceed $100. The per capita tax was fixed at 
seventy-five cents each six months, levied on eve^ member of the 
Order, to be collected by the installing officer in July and January. The 
Grand Parlor offered a prize of $100 for the best ritual submitted to 
the Ritual Committee within six months, which should meet the 
approval of the committee and the board of grand officers. On the 
last day of the session the Grand Parlor adopted the following impor- 
tant resolution: 








OAKLAND PARLOR, NO. 50. 

The original "Oakland Parlor," No. 2, was instituted December 16, 1877, and 
surrendered its charter in October, 1883. February 6, 1885, Oakland Parlor, No. 50, was 
instituted, with fifty-three charter members. The charter officers were: Past Presi- 
dent, Rod. W. Church ; President, R. M. Fitzgerald ; First Vice-President, W. H. Hine : 
Second Vice-President, F. W. Snook ; Third Vice-President, Jos. Becht ; Recording 








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HEMME& 



""Terms. 



^one^ 



Secretary, C.I,. Dam, Financial Secretary, W. W. Hunt; Treasurer, J. J. Paulsell 
Marshal, C. F. Mcwilliams. The present membership is 228 ; thirty-three members 
having been initiated during August of this year. j^ ^j 

The present officers of the Parlor are : Past President. G. S. Meredith ; President, 
J. H. Ames; First Vice-President, C. W. Frick; Second Vice-President, J. A. Ziegenfuss; 
Third Vice-President, M. A. Whidden ; Recording Secretary, P. C. Jordan ; Financial 
Secretary, W. H. Miller ; Treasurer, A. L. Stone ; Marshal, C. W. Cook. 



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SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST 



49 



" Resolved, That at entertainments, banquets and suppers given by 
the Grand or Subordinate Parlors the use of intoxicating, spirituous 
or malt liquors shall be strictly prohibited. The violation of this 
section by any Parlor shall be subject to such penalties as the Grand 
Parlor may provide for.' ' 

The following grand officers were elected for the ensuing term: 
Grand President, John A. Steinbach; Grand Vice-President, Curtis H. 
Lindley, of Stockton Parlor, No. 7; Grand Secretary, Henry Lunstedt, 
of California Parlor, No. 1; Grand Treasurer, F. H. Greely, of Marys- 
ville Parlor, No. 6; Grand Lecturer, Chas. W. Decker, of California 
Parlor, No. 1; Grand Marshal, J. E. La Rue, of Sunset Parlor, No. 26; 
Grand Orator, R. T. Devlin, of Sacramento Parlor, No. 3. The Grand 
President appointed Grand Inside Sentinel, J. J. Suffern, of California, 
No. i, and Grand Outside Sentinel, J. H. Corley, of Yosemite Parlor, 
No. 24. Upon motion, the Grand Parlor adjourned, to meet at San 
Jose in April, 1885. 

EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

The eighth annual session of the Grand Parlor met at San Jose, April 
13, 1885, Grand President John A. Steinbach presiding. Delegates from 
sixty-two Parlors were present, together with all the Grand Officers. All the 
Grand Officers presented elaborate reports. The report of the Grand Presi- 
dent showed a remarkable progress of the Order for the past year. He 
stated that thirty-six (36) new Parlors had been instituted, and that the mem- 
bership had increased from 1,248 to 2,900. The report of Grand Secretary 
Henry Lunstedt was complete in every detail. He said the receipts of the 
various Subordinate Parlors amounted to $25,050.27; disbursements $19, 666.19, 
of which amount $2,263 was f° r benefits, relieving seventy-five members and 
paying funeral expenses; the total amount on hand was $11,612.27; average 
assets, $5.17 for each member. He attributed the great prosperity not to the 
popular appreciation of the Order, but to the untiring energy and enthusi- 
asm of Grand President Steinbach and his able corps of assistants. 

Grand Lecturer Chas. W. Decker's report was equally valuable and inter- 
esting. He reported visiting nearly all the Parlors in the State; as Historian 
of the Order he had collected a large amount of valuable data, which he 
proposed submitting, as the history of the Order, at the next Grand Parlor. 

Grand Treasurer Greely reported cash on hand, $2,594.85. The action 
of the Grand President in requiring all Subordinate Parlors to purchase their 
supplies through the Grand Parlor had afforded a profit of $821.91. Much 



business of importance was transacted at this session, notably: adopting 
Certificate of Membership, designed by Ed. Hartman, of California Parlor, 
No. 1 ; striking out the clause in the Constitution of Subordinate Parlors lim- 
iting membership to those born in California since July 7, 1846 ; appointing 
a committee to devise ways and means of erecting a monument to General 
A. M. Winn ; providing for organization of Library and for Employment 
Committee ; the bond of the Treasurer was fixed at $5,000 ; the salary "of the 
Grand Secretary was raised to $600 per annum, and the per capita tax was 
fixed at $1.00 for each member, payable semi-annually in equal amounts; 
representation in the Grand Parlor was changed to one for every seventy- 
five members, or fraction of seventy-five over fifty, together with one dele- 
gate at large from each Parlor. Los Angeles was chosen for the next meet- 
ing place of the Grand Parlor, and Santa Rosa as the place for celebrating 
Admission Day. 

The following Grand Officers were elected and installed : Fred H. Greely, 
Grand President ; Chas. W. Decker, Grand Vice-President ; Henry Lunstedt, 
Grand Secretary ; J. H. Tibbits, Grand Treasurer ; George A. Whitby, Grand 
Lecturer; C. L. Weller, Grand Orator; L. W. Julliard, Grand Marshal; J. 
H. Corley, Grand Inside Sentinel ; J. L. Vignes, Grand Outside Sentinel : 
Grand Trustees, M. A. Dorn, James T. Murphy, C. H. Garoutte, W. A. 
Lawrence and R. T. Devlin. The Grand Parlor adopted resolutions thank- 
ing Grand President Steinbach for his splendid service in behalf of the 
Order, after which the Grand Parlor, on motion, adjourned. 

NINTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

The ninth annual session convened at Woodland, April 19, 1886, Grand 
President Fred H. Greely in the Chair. The Grand Officers during the term 
changed the place of meeting from Los Angeles to Woodland, owing to 
financial difficulties in Los Angeles Parlor. The report of Grand President 
Greely showed twenty-two new Parlors added to the Order, with an increase 
of membership from 2,900 to 4,300. He reported in detail many interesting 
decisions on constitutional law. Grand Secretary Lunstedt reported the re- 
ceipts of Subordinate Parlors to be $46,681.83 ; expenditures, $33,622.27 ; cash 
on band, $22,927.88; average assets per member, $6.18 ; profits to Grand 
Parlor for sale of supplies, $1,418.58. Grand Treasurer Tibbitts reported 
$4,653.73 in Grand Parlor treasury. The Grand Trustees, M. A. Dorn, chair- 
man, presented a lengthy and valuable report. The reports of the various 
Grand Officers, together with constitutional amendments submitted, were 
referred to the appropriate committees. The Grand Parlor continued in ses- 
sion for five days, and transacted an unusually large amount of business. A 



50 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



committee of five was appointed to draft a new Constitution, laws, etc. 
The uniform for drill corps was described in detail. The organization of the 
hall association in San Francisco was authorized ; a new Ritual adopted ; 
the Board of Trustees increased from five to seven. The per capita tax was 
fixed at seventy-five cents, thirty-five cents for the July term and forty cents 
for the January term, and the Grand Secretary's salary increased to $1,200 
per annum. 

A special committee, consisting of A. F. Jones, Clark Howard, H. W. 
Taylor, F. D. Ryan and M. A. Dora, was appointed to present a memorial to 
the Legislature of the State, asking that provision be made for the erection 
of a suitable monument to the late James W. Marshall, the discoverer of gold 
in California. 

San Jose was unanimously named as the place for holding the next 9th 
of September celebration; and Nevada City was selected for the meeting 
place of the next Grand Parlor. 

The election of officers resulted in the following choice : Grand Presi- 
dent, Chas. \V. Decker; Grand Vice-President, C. H. Garoutte ; Grand Sec- 
retary, Henry Lunstedt ; Grand Treasurer, Thomas Flint, Jr. ; Grand Lec- 
turer, A. J. Pedlar ; Grand Orator, Frank H. McNally ; Grand Marshal, Tom 
C. Barry ; Grand Inside Sentinel, T. J. McFarland ; Grand Outside Sentinel, 
M. C. Randolph ; Grand Trustees, M. A. Dorn, F. D. Ryan, J. E. Isaacs, W. 
E. Lindenberger, E. F. Dentler, G. B. Duncan and Clark Howard. 

TENTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

Grand President Charles W. Decker called the tenth annual session of 
the Grand Parlor to order, at Nevada City, on April 18, 1887. Sixteen Grand 
Officers and one hundred and twenty-one delegates were present. After the 
regular opening ceremonies the grand body proceeded to the transaction of 
business, much of which was of great importance. The Grand President 
reported that the year had been one of promise and success ; the condition 
of the Order was flattering ; the membership had steadily increased, and the 
financial status was eminently satisfactory ; twenty new Parlors were insti- 
tuted, and the Order was increased by 2,000 new members. The Grand 
President reported having visited 65 of the 105 Parlors in the Order. 

The Grand Secretary reported the receipts of the year to be $59,475. 79 ; 
disbursements, $47,201.85 of which $7,460.85 was for benefits, affording relief 
to 278 members; cash assets, $34,519.83, an average of $7.12 per member. 
The total membership in the Order was reported to be 5,247. The profit on 
the sale of supplies amounted to $1,316.74. Grand Treasurer Thomas Flint, 
Jr., reported the total receipts of the Grand Parlor $13,733.03; disburse- 
ments, $9,392.06; cash on hand April 1st, $4,340.97. 



The Committee on Marshall Memorial reported that the State Legisla- 
ture had appropriated the sum of $5,000 to erect a suitable monument over 
the grave of the discoverer of gold, and that the Governor had appointed as 
commissioners H. C. Gesford, A. Caminetti and J. H. Miller. At this meet- 
ing a per capita tax of fifty cents for each member of the Order was levied 
for the purpose of erecting a monument over the grave of General A. M. 
Winn, the founder of the Order of the N. S. G. W. 

A petition for a charter was received from Tombstone, Arizona Territory. 
After a protracted and eloquent debate the petition was denied. 

A Visiting Board, consisting of the Grand President, Grand Vice-Presi- 
dent, Grand Lecturer and Grand Orator, were appointed. 

Fresno was selected for the next meeting of the Grand Parlor, and Napa 
for the place of holding the annual 9th of September celebration. 

The Grand Officers elected were : Grand President, C. H. Garoutte ; 
Grand Vice-President, M. A. Dorn ; Grand Secretary, Henry Lunstedt ; 
Grand Treasurer, Otto Grunsky ; Grand Lecturer, W. H. McLaughlin ; 
Grand Orator, Jackson Hatch ; Grand Marshal, Henry C. Gesford ; Grand 
Inside Sentinel, M. C. Randolph ; Grand Outside Sentinel, F. G. Ostrancler; 
Grand Trustees, Frank D. Ryan, John E. McDougald, C. M. Belshaw, Thos. 
Flint, Jr., James E. Isaacs, E. D. McCabe. 

ELEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

The eleventh annual session was called to order at Fresno April 16, 1888, 
by Grand President Charles H. Garoutte. All the Grand Officers were pres- 
ent, together with delegates from 123 Parlors. The Grand Parlor was opened 
in due form; and the several Grand Officers and Committees submitted their 
reports for the year. The Grand President's report was lengthy and in- 
structive. He had been called upon to decide many important constitutional 
questions. The report reviewed the progress for the year, and pronounced it 
eminently satisfactory. The question of the excessive expenditures of 
moneys by the Subordinate Parlors for the Admission Day celebration was 
considered, and the Grand Parlor advised to pass a restraining law. The 
subjects of Ritual and Finance were carefully reviewed; and in seeking new 
fields of work outside of the boundary line of the State of California the 
Grand Parlor was admonished to make haste slowly. 

The Grand Secretary reported the membership to be, on April 1, 1888, 
6,000. Twenty-three new Parlors were organized during the year. The re- 
ceipts of the various Parlors were $75,789.05; expenditures, $64,954.65; cash 
on hand, $47,216.30, an average of $8.33 per member. The sum of $io,~ 
285.65 was paid for benefits, relieving 325 members. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



51 



Grand Treasurer Otto Grunsky reported $6,881.45 in the treasury of the 
Grand Parlor. 

The report of the General Winn Monument Committee was submitted 
and accepted. The sum of $2,420.50 was in the hands of the committee; and 
they were authorized to proceed with the work. 

The President of the Board of Trustees was added to the Visiting Board. 

A special committee on the preservation of Sutter's Fort at Sacramento 
was appointed. 

The per capita tax was fixed at sixty cents for the year. 

Santa Cruz was selected for the annual celebration, and San Rafael for 
the next place of meeting of the Grand Parlor. 

The Grand Officers elected were: M. A. Dorn, Grand President; Frank 
D. Ryan, Grand Vice-President; Henry Lunstedt, Grand Secretary ; L. W. 
Julliard, Grand Treasurer ; Wm. H. Miller, Grand Lecturer ; R. M. Fitz- 
gerald, Grand Orator ; Frank Mattison, Grand Marshal ; FredG. Ostrander, 
Grand Inside Sentinel ; Conrad Gottwals, Grand Outside Sentinel ; Grand 
Trustees, A. J. Pedlar, J. Mervyn Donahue, Austin B. Sperry, Homer C. 
Katz, W. W. Greer, Henry C. Gesford. 

TWELFTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

The twelfth annual convention met at San Rafael on April 15, 1889, 
Grand President M. A. Dorn in the chair. He said: " The year just closed 
has been one of peace, good will and continued prosperity, giving renewed 
assurances of the promiuence and prosperity of our Order. The member- 
ship is being rapidly recruited by additions of the most representative and 
respectable young men of the community. Our treasury is already large, 
and is rapidly and steadily increasing. Our Order is no longer struggling 
for place, characterized as a boys' society and looked down upon, but has 
already taken high rank among fraternal societies, and is rapidly coming to 
be recognized as the foremost fraternal order of the State. Our demands 
from the sick and needy have never gone unheeded; and, above all things, 
our members are proud, zealous and enthusiastic in the work of the Order, 
united, harmonious and contented, and filled with a love for each other and 
pervaded with a spirit of pure and genuine fraternity. In short, we are 
working out for ourselves that grand fraternal and personal destiny which is 
to make California the most perfect and prosperous of the earth." 

The Grand President's report exhaustively treated of the finances, ritual, 
constitutional law and internal discipline of the Order, besides containing 
many wise and judicious recommendations to the Grand Parlor. 

The Grand Secretary reported sixteen new Parlors organized, and the 
membership increased to 7,000. The receipts of the various Parlors 



amounted to $87,364.16. Disbursements, $76,068.52. The sum of $16,896.71 
was paid for benefits, relieving 525 members. $63,466.68 was the total 
assets of all the Parlors, an average of $9.69 for each member. 

The Grand Secretary reported the death of Past Grand President F. J. 
Higgins; Past Grand Marshal Thomas Barry; ex-Grand Parlor members 
Henry B. Johnson of Grass Valley, and James E. Andrews of San Fran- 
cisco; also the death of forty -seven members of the Order. 
The Grand Treasurer reported $3, 186.40 cash on hand. 
The Committee on General Winn Monument presented a final report, 
which was adopted and the committee discharged, with the thanks of the 
Grand Parlor. The report of the committee showed that they had received 
from the Order the sum of $2,440, and expended $2,376.15, leaving a balance 
of $63.85, which was transferred to the treasury of the Grand Parlor. The 
dedication of the monument took place on the afternoon of Thursday, 
November 28th (Thanksgiving Day), at Sacramento, and was participated 
in by a large concourse of the Native Sons of the Golden West, uuder 
whose auspices the ceremonies were held. 

The Committee on the State of the Order presented a report, reviewing 
in detail the work of the Grand Officers, and making many important sug- 
gestions. A plan for the organization of the N. S. G. W. Reading Room 
Association, providing for incorporation, with a capital stock of $100,000, 
was submitted and indorsed. 

The Committee on Voluntary Life Insurance was given a year to perfect 
plans. 

The per capita tax was fixed at seventy cents, and the salary of the 
Grand Secretary at $2,000 for the year. 

The following Grand Officers were elected: Frank D. Ryan, Grand 
President; Wm. H. Miller, Grand Vice-President; Henry Lunstedt, Grand 
Secretary; Henry S. Martin, Grand Treasurer; J. W. Ahern, Grand Lec- 
turer; F. P. Tuttle, Grand Orator; Jas. T. Rucker, Grand Marshal; Conrad 
Gottwals, Grand Inside Sentinel; H. G. W. Dinkelspiel, Grand Outside Sen- 
tinel; Grand Trustees: J. Mervyn Donahue, A. B. Sperry, F. L. Coombs, R. 
M. Fitzgerald, John R. Aitken, T. W. H. Shanahan. 

San Jose was selected for the Admission Day Celebration, and Chico for 
the place of holding the next Grand Parlor. 

THIRTEENTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

Grand President Frank D. Ryan called the thirteenth session of the 
Grand Parlor to order at Chico on April 28, 1890. The Grand Officers (with 
the exception of three Grand Trustees) and 181 delegates were present ; and 
it was the largest Grand Parlor ever assembled. 



62 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



Grand President Ryan opened the Grand Parlor with the usual cere- 
monies, following which a Committee of Three ou Credentials was appointed. 
Pending their report the Grand Parlor adjourned to accept of the hospital- 
ities of Chico Parlor. The Grand Parlor met again at 7 o'clock p. M., when 
the reports of the Grand Officers and the various committees were submitted 
and 011 motion referred to the Committee on the State of the Order for dis- 
tribution. 

The report of the Grand President was a record of conscientious work. 
Every detail of the Order's progress and material interest was reviewed. 
Thirty-two appeals on constitutional law were submitted and decided. The 
questions of Ritual, Board of Relief, Visiting Board, etc. , were exhaustively 
treated of ; and valuable suggestions were made to the Grand Parlor. Sev- 
enteen new Parlors were instituted for the term, and the membership 
increased to 8,000. The Grand President declared himself as pleased to 
congratulate the Order upon the sutstantial growth it had made, which 
should be gratifying to every Native Son, and hoped that they would all 
continue to work together in harmony, and with unselfish motives give 
faithful attention to their labors for the accomplishment of one object, — the 
continued welfare and prosperity of the Order. 

; Grand Secretary Lunstedt's report showed the Order to be in a healthy 
financial condition, there being $78,022.90 in the treasury of the Subordin- 
ate Parlors, an average of $10.51 per member. The receipts of the year 
amounted to $100,325.84. The disbursements, $82,721.12, of which $21,- 
56S.42 was paid for benefits, relieving 641 members. 

Grand Treasurer Henry S. Martin reported amount on hand, $3,496.76. 

The reports of the other Grand Officers were equally interesting and 
instructive, being replete with the workings and needs of the Order, and 
offering many valuable suggestions. 

The business transacted during this session was of great moment to 
the Order. The question of the extension of the jurisdiction outside of the 
State of California, which had excited animated debates in previous Grand 
Parlors, was practically settled by an amendment made to the Constitution 
providing that the Board of Grand Officers have the power to grant charters 



for the organization of Parlors of the N. S. G. W. only within the State of 
California. To amend this provision of the Constitution requires a two- 
thirds vote of all the delegates present. 

The Sutter's Fort Committee, Ryan, Chairman, presented their report, 
and were authorized to complete the purchase of the site for the N. S. G. W. 
as soon as the aggregate amount of subscriptions justified the final transfer 
of the property to the Order, and were further authorized that, after the pur- 
chase was made, to offer the Sutter Fort property to the State of California 
for the use of the people of the State, and were instructed to ask the Legisla- 
ture to make suitable appropriation for the maintenance of the property 
and restoration of the old Fort. [The committee have since reported that 
the requisite amount, $20,000, has been acquired, and the property purchased 
by them for the N. S. G. W.j 

The deaths of Grand Trustee J. Mervyn Donahue and General M. G. 
Vallejo were reported, and appropriate resolutions adopted. 

The Committee on Marshall Memorial reported their labors completed, 
and that the unveiling of the monument would take place at Coloma, the 
place of discovery of gold on the 19th of January, 1848, on Monday, May 
3, 1890. 

The Visiting Board was increased by the addition of the Board of 
Trustees. 

The per capita tax was fixed at seventy cents for the ensuing year. 

Upon invitation of the San Francisco delegates it was unanimously 
decided to hold the next Admission Day celebration (it being the fortieth 
anniversary of California's Statehood) in that city. 

Santa Rosa was selected for the place of meeting of the next Grand 
Parlor. 

The Grand Officers elected were: Wm. H. Miller, Grand President; R. 
M. Fitzgerald, Grand Vice-President; Henry Lunstedt, Grand Secretary; 
Henry S. Martin, Grand Treasurer; Charles L- Tilden, Grand Marshal; 
Walter Greer, Grand Lecturer; James I. Boland, Grand Orator; H. G. W. 
Dinkelspiel, Grand Inside Sentinel; Bertrand Rhine, Grand Outside Sen- 
tinel; Grand Trustees: J. D. Sproul, John T. Greany, Eugene J. Gregory, 
Wm. H. Thornly, Henry Hogan, George A. McCalvy, D. E. Morgan. 



A Home without a "NEW HOME" is not a complete Home. 



This is a Perfect Picture (Pkoto&rapM) of tie Doll in oor WMot , 

■Where she mav be seen all day long, rocking or swinging as suits her pleasure, to the 
great delight of all who pass by. She sometimes loans her swing to her two little sisters, who 
stand up and swing, while she rocks as we all sing our pretty new waltz-song, 



Rock-a-Bye Dolly." 




Improved Woodwork. Antique Oak or Walnut 




This window is one of the " Sight* of * Great 
City," and a landmark which is easily and always 
remembered by those who visit San Francisco, being 
located in the beautiful History Building, on the 
south side of Market Street, between Third and 
Fourth Streets. What is it all about? Simply 
to prevent people going astray, and for the purpose 
of locating in the minds of all citizens the General 
Agency for "The Popular New Home," Light 
Running Sewing Machine, Leader of the Age in 
Practical Improvements. 

The New Home Sewing Machine Company, 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT, 
DISTRIBUTING OFFICE AND CITY SALESROOMS, 

726 Market Street, 

History Building, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Home and Friends. 



" Oh ! there's a power to make each hour 

As sweet as heaven designed it ; 
Nor need we roam to bring it home, 

Though few there be that find it. 
We seek too high for things close by, 

And lose what nature found us ; 
For life has here no charms so dear 

As home and friends around us. 

We oft destroy the present joy "=» 

For future hopes— and praise them ; 
Whilst flowers as sweet, bloom at our feet, 

If we'd but stoop to raise them. 
For things afar, still sweetest are 

When youth'sbright spell hath bound us; 
But soon we're taught the earth hath naught 

Like home and friends around us. 

Make your home a happy home by 
placing there a "NKW HOME." 



Ladies are cordially invited to make their headquarters at our rooms when they visit San Francisco. Leave packages, bundles, etc. 
and if agreeable, make appointments to meet friends at this central location where all are welcome. 



Official Programme. 



the events of the celebratton are as follows: 
Saturday, September 6th. 

In the evening there will be a parade of different organizations, giving various illuminated effects. The various Drill Corps 
of the N. S. G. W. will make special displays. In Union Square a concert will be given by an immense band. The Square will 
be beautifully illuminated and decorated, and, to add to the effect, there will be fireworks in great variety and abundance. 

Sunday, September 7TH. . 

The day will be spent in receiving the interior Parlors. The Native Daughters will receive at che Mechanics' Pavilion. In 
the afternoon, at Golden Gate Park, the Park Band will give a special concert, with a largely increased number of musicians. 

Monday, September 8th. 

During the day vessels and boats of all classes will enter into competition for valuable prizes offered by the Committee. 
Grand receptions will be held by the Parlors at the Pavilion and throughout the city. In the evening a promenade concert and 
tableaux, by the Native Daughters, will be held at the Pavilion. 

Tuesday, September 9TH. 

In the morning the grand parade will take place, to be followed in the afternoon by the literary exercises at the Grand 
Opera House. At this time, also, the various Parlors of the city will be receiving their guests in the Pavilion, or at the separate 
headquarters outside. In the evening the grand ball will take place in the Mechanics' Pavilion. Manj 7 Parlors which have 
headquarters in other halls will also give entertainments upon this evening. A grand display of fireworks will take place at the 
corner of Sixteenth and Folsom streets. 

Wednesday, September ioth. 

The Committee has arranged for the devotion of this day to an excursion around the bay, and to Mare Island, providing 
for that purpose several of the largest bay steamers. 



N. S. G. W. 



SPECIALLY WRITTEN FOR THE SOUVENIR BY HARRY DIX. 



SONS of the Golden West,— a name 
To every freeman dear : 
Thy sires' bright past, thy country's fame, 
Are each depicted here. 
Across our streets your banners fling, 
And float like birds upon the wing 

In gay career; 
While sea and wind unite to sing, — 
Welcome each Pioneer. 



Sons of the Golden West : Thy clime 

The horn of plenty filled ; 
And honest labor, linked with time, 

Thy broadest acres tilled. 
Thy streams, thy hills, thy plains give gold ; 
And every tree grows manifold 

With generous yield. 

There was a time, ere progress came 
And launched her rolling car ; 

Ere man reclaimed this wide domain, 
And distances were far ; 

When comfort seemed unknown to men, — 

And traveling's greatest ease was then 
The wagon's jolt andjar. 

There was a time, some decades back, 
When savage tribes held sway 

In this bright land, and dogged the track 
Of settlers on their way, — 

A whoop, a rush, a bloody scalp, 

A fight or futile cry for help, 
To mar the day. 



No more, no more with crawling pace 

Long caravans extend, 
Or wind like serpents in the chase 

Across the mountain bend. 
No more behind the barricade, 
So bravely held and roughly made, 

Our sires themselves defend. 



Forever gone and changed this scene, 

And in its place appears 
Calm peace, with a contented mien, 

And venerable years. 
The desert waste our herds support ; 
And where our fathers built their fort 

A prosperous city rears. 



But boast we of some relics yet, 
Which still their interest keep ; 

Whose sun, though sunk, has not yet set ; 
Whose faithful children sleep. 

Forlorn and hoary as the hills ; 

The " Missions" lift their lonely sills 
A ruined heap. 



San C&rlos' bells are hushed and still ; 

And broken is her sway. 
Herdusky subjects roam at will; 

At eve no vespers play. 
New creeds, new life, new churches sing 
Throughout the land a different hymn 

And newer lav. 



Long years this land with plenty fed 
The Spaniard and his chase ; 

Long years the native Indian led 
His tribe from place to place : 

Till men with hearts and spirits bold 

In '48 — discovered gold 
At Sutter's race. 



Then spread the news from sea to sea; 

Each crag gave back the sound ; 
And nations in their rivalry 

Fought side by side for ground 
Where scarcely human feet before 
Had dared to tread : the people pour. 

For fortune bound. 



Thus heralded with swift advance 
New towns phenomenal rise : 

The humble lot acquired by chance 
Becomes a moneyed prize. 

From new erections ring a chime ; 

And spires seem bent by upward climb 
To reach the skies. 



And progress comes and still shall come, 

Until the landscape bright, 
As far as where the setting sun 

Sinks slowly out of sight ; 
Shall dotted be with homes of men, 
And habitations grace the glen 

With portals white. 



Land of the redwood, truth and worth, 

Is there a clime so fair? 
So blessed in birth, with fertile earth 

And mineral treasures rare ? 
We may not boast an ancient name ; 
Our labor gives us right to fame 

And honor everywhere. 

Both east and west to Europe's shores. 
Our fields their burdens send ; 

Where loud the rude Pacific roars, 
And China's coasts extend. 

The trembling peasants, from those zones 

Where tyrants rule, forsake their homes 
And hail this land as friend. 

Within our headlands sharp and steep 

Are harbors safe and wide ; 
And anchored there a mighty fleet 

Lies floating on the tide. 
Without, in watchful, solemn state, 
The white cliffs of the Golden Gate 

Keep guard in pride. 



Though far we roam across the sea, 

Hold we our land the best ; 
And fortune's favored son is he 

Who haileth from the West. 
What tie so strong as that which binds 
The strength of youth and noble minds 

In "Order" blest? 
We love the land that for us finds 

Both peace and rest. 



The Native Sons of the Golden West 



PARLORS OF THE ORDER. 



CALIFORNIA PARLOR, NO. I, SAN FRANCISCO. 

During the preparations incidental to the celebration of the Fourth of July, 1875, Gen. 
John McComb, Grand Marshal ot the parade of that year, inserted in the advertising 
columns of the daily press, on the morning of June 24th, an invitation to the native sons 
of San Francisco over fourteen years of age to meet in the Police Courtroom, Tuesday 
night, June 29th, aud organize for the purpose of taking part in the celebration of the 
National holiday. 

This public notice was the means of bringing together the young men who conceived 
and carried into execution the formation of the Order of the Native Sons of the Golden 
West. In accordance with the call, a small but enthusiastic body met and organized for 
the purpose of taking part in the parade, and further decided to perpetuate the organiza- 
tion under the name of the " Native Sons of the Golden State." 

Gen. A. M. Winn was present and called the meeting to order, and briefly stated the 
purpose of the meeting to be the formation of a society of native Californians. 

Myles F. O'Donnell was chosen Chairman, and Louis A. Patrick, Secretary; and it 
was resolved to appoint a committee to prepare a Constitution and code of By-Laws for the 
government of the proposed society. The next meeting was held on Sunday, July II, 
1875 ; and from this meeting dates the beginning of the Order. 

The name of the Native Sons of the Golden State was changed to the Native Sons of 
the Golden West, a Constitution aud By-Laws adopted, and regular officers elected to hold 
office until the nth day of January, 1S76. 

The officers elected and the members forming the society were as follows : John A. 
Steinbach, President; Jasper Fishbourne, First Vice-President; F. G. W. Fenn, Second 
Vice-President; S. P. Harmon, Third Vice-President; C. H. Smith, Recording Secretary; 
H. F. Harmon, Financial Secretary; H. C. Stevenson, Treasurer; F. Streeper, Marshal. 
Executive Committee: Johu E. McDougald, S. M. Stemwood, Myles O'Donnell, Abraham 
Mayer, C. D. Olds. 

Gen. Winn had drafted a Constitution for the government of the new society, and pre- 
sented it; and with some slight amendment it was adopted. 

Gen. Winn was elected an honorary member of the society by a unanimous vote. 
C. H. Smith, J. E. McDougald and J. A. Steinbach were appointed a Committee on Ritual. 

The Native Sons continued their weekly meetings with great enthusiasm; and new 
member j were rapidly added to the original nucleus of the Native Sons of the Golden 
West. 

In the latter part of 1877 and the early part of 1S78, branches were formed in Oakland 
and Sacramento; and then the original organization adopted the name of Calilornia Parlor, 
No. 1. On November 30, 1578, a Grand Parlor was formed, in which the supervisory power 
afterwards became vested. 

California Parlor is the foremost Parlor of the Order, with a membership of 470 and a 
treasury of $6,000, and is constantly increasing both as to size and finances. The present 
officers are: 



Past President, O. F. Westphal; President, Arthur Klumpp; First Vice-President, Frank 
W. Marston; Second Vice-President, Jas. P. Dockery; Third Vice-President, Alex. Dijeau; 
Recording Secretary, Frank B. Ryan; Financial Secretary, Harry Lachman; Treasurer, 
Chas. Maginnis; Marshal, Frank W. Yale. Trustees: Chas. W. Decker, E. F. Dentler, B. R. 
Harwood. Surgeons: J. F. Morse, M. D.; V. A. Chaigneau, M. D.; D.D. Lustig, M. D.; 
B. F. Clarke, M. D. Past Presidents: J. E. McDougald, G. H. Fairchild, Jno. H. Grady, A. C. 
Lutgens, Frank J. Higgins, F. G. Wisker, Henry Lunstedt, Chas. Maginnis, John R. 
Matches, Chas. W. Decker, E. L. Meyer, John H Jones, Henry Mayer, Ed. Hartmann. 
J. B. Sheridan, E. J. Grady, John Jackson, P. F. Dunne, W. W. Shannon. A. A. Watson, 
J. J. Jamison, G. H. Umbsen, C. A. Boldemann, L. J. Lalande, J. R. Sloan, O. F. Westphal. 

SACRAMENTO PARLOR, NO. 3, SACRAMENTO. 

Sacramento Parlor, No. 3, N. S. G. W., was organized on March 22, 1878, with twenty- 
one charter members. The Parlor takes it name from the city in which it is located. The 
membership of the Parlor at present is one hundred and thirty-five. 

The present officers of the Parlor are: Past President, James Henderson, Jr. ; Presi- 
dent, Jos. B. Leonard; First Vice-President, H. K. Johnson ; Second Vice-President, J. F. 
M. Bronner ; Third Vice-President, Walter Welch ; Recording Secretary, Theo. G. Eilers ; 
Financial Secretary, F. T. Garrett; Marshal, H. Moose; Trustees: Wm. Lamphrey, E. 
Wachorst, F. Welch. 

PACIFIC PARLOR, NO. 10, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Pacific Parlor, No. 10, was instituted November 3, 18S1, by Past Grand President Frank 
J. Higgins, Grand Secretary Henry Lunstedt, Deputy Grand President John Nagle, and 
Grand President John H. Grady, with John A. Steinbach as Past President, C. L. Weller 
as President, Wm. Metzner First Vice-President, G. W. McPherson Second Vice-President. 
H. D. Kelly, Third Vice-President ; Recording Secretary, Leonard W. Kidd ; Financial Sec- 
retary, S. H. McPherson ; Treasurer, F. R. Underhill ; Executive Committee, Wm. lie- 
Closkey, M. G. Searing and J. P.Jones; Marshal, W. J. Wiley ; Inside Sentinel, J. W. 
Shaver ; Outsic'e Sentinel, W. J. Barry, and twenty-seven charter members. 

The Parlor takes its name from the grand, majestic, but yet calm, Pacific ocean. The 
Parlor is at present in a flourishing condition, financially and socially, with a member- 
ship of 275. It has had the honor of having three Grand Presidents : John A. Steinbach, 
M. A. Dorn, and the present incumbent of that office, W. H. Miller. It includes among its 
membership some of the most prominent men in the Order, and is the proud possessorof 
a banner, the beauty and artistic ensemble of which is not surpassed or even equalled by 
any other banner in the Order. This banner was presented to the Parlor by Miss Inga 
Petersen, President of Alta Parlor, No. 3, N. D. G. W., and is the work of her own fair 



56 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



hands aud brain. From the time that Pacific Parlor was instituted the Order took a new 
lease of life, and from the time we sent our first Grand President, John A. Steinbach, to 
the front the growth of the Order has been remarkable. 

The present officers are as follows : Past President, D. L. Fitzgerald ; President, S. 
W. Dixon; First Vice-President, H. E. Faure; Second Vice-President, R. D. Cameron; 
Third Vice-President, C. E. S. Duulevy ; Recording Secretary, John C.Miller; Financial 
Secretary, Geo. E. Cameron ; Treasurer, John A. Steinbach ; Marshal, Edw. Goetzse ; 
Board of Trustees: J. A. Kropp, A. E. Holmes and Theodore Foster Tracy ; Surgeon, E. 
R. Ballard ; Historian, D. L. Fitzgerald. 

FRESNO PARLOR, NO. 25, FRESNO CITY. 

Organized December 16, 1S83. with twenty-six charter members, by District Deputy 
Grand President P. C. Jurgeus, of Visalia, assisted by F. O. Owens, Chas. F. McCarthy, 
George A. Whitby, J. C. Simmons, E. F. Branch, B. F. Huddleson and Arthur Ray, of 
Modesto Parlor; T. F. Carrigau, W. H. Ostrander, John R. Jones, Geo. E. Catts, ofYo- 
semite Parlor ; Geo. \V. McPherson, of Pacific, and E. F. Bernhard, of California Parlor. 

Meets every Tuesday evening in N. S. G. W. Parlors, over Farmers' Bank of Fresno. 
Present membership, thirty-four. 

Past Presidents : T. M. Hughes (deceased), J. J. White, A. J. Pedlar, Walter Lyon, S. 
J. Ashman, W. C. Guard, E. F. Bernhard, A. Newhouse, Harry Burton, L. Heringhi; 
President, F. M. Lane ; First Vice-President, D. R. Prince ; Second Vice-President, C. F. 
Dickenson ; Third Vice-President, Chas. Bonner ; Recording Secretary, A. Newhouse ; 
Financial Secretary, Harry Burton; Treasurer, W. C. Guard; Marshal, I. Benas; Trus- 
tees : S. J. Ashman," J. F. Bedford, E. F. Bernhard ; Surgeon, A. J. Pedlar ; Historian, E. F. 
Bernhard. 

About the 1st of July, 1SS9, it was determined by the Parlor to secure rooms of its own 
for meeting and social purposes, and to furnish them accordingly. A desirable suite of 
rooms upon the third floor of the Farmers' Bank building was secured and elegantly 
furnished with Brussels carpets, upholstered furniture, lace and silk curtains, antique oak 
tables, piano, mirrors, pictures, etc., making complete parlors. The main Parlor is 
twenty-six feet square. Every member has a key, with the privilege of using the Parlors 
at any time when not in use. They are also used by Vina Parlor, No. 25, N. D. G. W. 

GOLDEN GATE PARLOR, NO. 29, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Golden Gate Parlor was instituted May 2, 1884, by Past Grand President J. A. Stein- 
bach, assisted by Past Grand President C. W. Decker, Edward Hartmann, of California 
Parlor, No. 1, acting as President. Ninety-eight members were initiated; and the follow- 
ing were installed: Past President, Geo. Lacombe; President, James I. Boland; First Vice- 
President. Geo. H. Pippy; Second Vice-President, J. A. Sullivan; Third Vice-President, 
T. F. McDermott; Recording Secretary, Chas. T. Stanley; Financial Secretary, T. C. Conmy; 
Treasurer, Geo. T. Poultney; Marshal, Emil B. Villam; Trustees: W. H. Jones, F. J. Mc- 
Counell, F. R. Drinkhouse; Surgeon, L. Vau Orden, M. D. Jas. H. Stack was appointed 
Inside Sentinel, and Win. Martin, Outside Sentinel. 

Golden Gate Parlor has been very prosperous, and now numbers 247 members, and 
financially is very well fixed. The Treasurer shows a balance in his last report of over 
$3,000, notwithstanding the fact that one member alone has drawn $2,700 sick benefits. It 
is the only Parlor in the city that pays a death benefit. A provision in its By-Laws states 
that, upon the death of a member, an assessment of one dollar shall be levied upon each 
member, which assessment, together with all fines for non-attendance at the funeral, is 
guaranteed to the proper relative. 

The following are the Past Presidents of Golden Gate Parlor: Geo. Lacombe, Geo. H. 
Pippy, F. L. Parker, E. B. Villam, Chas. H. Connell, R. P. Hammond, Jr., W. S. Pottho0, 



Wm. Kahn, A. Eberhart, E. Alexander and F. A. Gore. Following are the officers for the 
present term: Past President, F. A. Gore; President, B. J. KilUlea; First Vice-President, 
T. P. Leonard; Second Vice-President, Otto Koeper; Third Vice-President, Elmer D. Roach; 
Recording Secretary, Thos. C. Conmy; Financial Secretary, J. L. Arbogast; Treasurer, C. 
C. Bruce; Marshal, Martin Eichel; Outside Sentinel, J. Sheehan; Inside Sentinel, W. A. 
King; Trustees, C. J. Siebert, D. A. Huntemann, Wm. Martin; Surgeon, Dr. G. J. Fitz- 
gibbons. 

GENERAL WINN PARLOR, NO. 32, ANTIOCH. 

General Winn Parlor, No. 32, was instituted in Antioch, July 26, 1884, by Grand Presi- 
dent John A. Steinbach, assisted by Brothers C. W. Decker, Henry Hartmann, J. F. 
Stranahan, D. S. Jeffry, Chas. McGinnis and F. W. Yale, with the following officers: Presi- 
dent, Chas. F. Montgomery; Secretary, C. M. Belshaw; Treasurer, E. Wheelihen; Marshal, 
R. R. Veale, and ten other members. 

The Parlor takes its name from the founder of the Order, General A. M. Winn. The 
interest and devotion of its members to the Order has never abated from the very first 
meeting. Immediately after its organization, it filled up and furnished its own Parlor, 
and has always enjoyed social and financial prosperity. Though a small Parlor, its mem- 
bers are earnest workers; and it has twicebeen represented on the Board of Grand Officers. 
General Winn Parlor has always taken an active part in the deliberations of the Grand 
Parlors, and has always been represented at every Celebration. It has just had a fine 
banner manufactured, adorned with a life-like painting of the late General Winn, which 
will be carried for the first time in the forthcoming Ninth of September celebration. The 
present membership is thirty. 

The present officers are: Past President, F. P. Reed; President, R. H. Wall; First Vice- 
President, E. H. Stinchfield; Second Vice-President, C. F. Montgomery; Third Vice-Presi- 
dent, Archibald Love; Recording Secretary, Geo. B. Callan; Financial Secretary, Elmer 
E. Page; Treasurer, C. M. Belshaw; Marshal, N. A. Tyler, Jr.; Inside Sentinel, Wm. J. 
Remfree; Outside Sentinel, Carroll Marble; Trustees, C. F. Mongomery, F. P. Reed, C. M. 
Belshaw. 

MISSION PARLOR, NO. 38, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This Parlor, which is one of the largest and most prosperous in the Order, was insti- 
tuted on August 28, 1884, and took its name from that portion of San Francisco in which 
the majority of its members reside. At the first meeting thirty-five members signed the 
roll, and since then its growth has been remarkable, the number at present on the roll 
being three hundred and twenty-five. It atoncejumpedinto the front rank of Parlors in 
the Order, and to-day is in a most flourishing condition, ranking second in membership 
and first in finances. It has a treasury of $8,000, of which $7,000 is invested in a lot on 
Seventeenth street near Valencia, on which it proposes to erect in the near future the first 
N. S. G. W. Hall in this city. 

Its present officers are: Past President, Robert C. Mitchell ; President, W. J. Guilfoyle ; 
First Vice-President, H. L. Hartman; Second Vice-President, F. W.Burnett; Third Vice- 
President, H. A. Bilay ; Recording Secretary, W. H. Powers ; Financial Secretary, J. F. 
Lane ; Treasurer, F. H. Mills ; Marshal, R. D. Duke ; Surgeon, W. H. McLaughlin, M. D. ; 
Trustees: E. J. O'Rourke, W. W. Fairchild, C. E. Birch ; Organist, P. W. Kimball. 

HYDRAULIC PARLOR, NO. 56, NEVADA CITY. 

Hydraulic Parlor, No. 56, was instituted February 27, 1885, by Grand President John 
A. Steinbach, assisted by E. K. Campbell as Marshal, with W. J. Richards, Past President, 
L. B. Johnson, President, and W. T. Morgan, Recording Secretary. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



57 



Being in the heart of the mining section, and onr Parlor having been instituted at 
the time when the hydraulic mining controversy was at its highest, led to its name. The 
Grand Parlor was entertained by us at Nevada City in 1887. Starting with but nineteen 
members, we now have one hundred and thirty-five, and a well-filled treasury. 

The present officers are: E. J. Ott, Past President: E. J. Baker, President; Frank 
Worthington, First Vice-President; L. D. Nihell, Second Vice-President: G. A. Bailey, Third 
Vice-President; W. T. Morgan, Recording Secretary; J. M. Hussey, Financial Secretary; 
D. E. Morgan, Treasurer; Wm . "Walters, Marshal; Wm. Dunster, Inside Sentinel; Thos. 
Dillon, Outside Sentinel; Fred Searls, Jas. Hanley, W.J . Smith, Trustees. 

QUARTZ PARLOR, NO. 58, GRASS VALLEY. 

Quartz Parlor, No. 58, was instituted March 28, 1885, by Grand President John A. 
Steinbach and District Deputy Leroy B. Johnson, with Thomas C. Hocking as President, 
R. D. Finnie as Secretary, and twenty-five or more other charter members. 

The Parlor is one of the most prominent in the Order, attaining its high standing by 
its work in instituting several new Parlors, also a Parlor of the N. D. G. W. Social 
achievements and the personnel of its membership have also contributed to its success. 

Quartz Parlor takes its name from the paramount industry of the city in which it is 
located,— gold quartz mining. The Grass Valley district in this particular stands at the 
head of all like districts of the world, while on the soil above the precious veins of ore 
deciduous fruits attain their perfection. One vear after the organization of the Parlor, the 
ladies of Grass Valley presented it with one of the costliest and most beautiful banners the 
State can boast of. The Parlor also has to its credit a plethoric treasury. Its membership 
is eighty-four, and is increasing at every meeting. 

The present officers are : President, W. F. Pnsk ; First Vice-President, Chas. E. Uren ; 
Second Vice-President, D. T. Donovan ; Third Vice-President, Fred H. Carr ; Recording 
Secretary, Jas. H. Bennallack ; Financial Secretary, John L. Dodge ; Treasurer, A. Mc- 
Kay ; Marshal, John H. Coughlin ; Trustees : C. E. Clinch, J. S. Hennessey, A. F. Perrin ; 
Historian, Thos. C. Hocking; Past President, M. P. Stone ; Inside Sentinel, J. E. Hogan ■ 
Outside Sentinel, Berwick Hansen. 

NAPA PARLOR, NO. 62, NAPA. 

Napa Parlor, No. 62, N. S. G. W., was instituted April 10, 1885, by-Grand "President Jno 
A. Steinbach. It has had three Grand Officers, viz.: H. C. Gesford, Grand Marshal • F L 
Coombs. Grand Trustee ; H. B. Hogan, Grand Trustee. It has a membership of eighty- 
three. The present officers of the parlor are: President, H. H Muller; Past President T 
M. Earl ; First Vice-President, R. A. Brownlee ; Second Vice-President, Wm. Gwynne Jr.- 
Third Vice-President, A. M. Lockard ; Recording Secretary, C. R. Smith ; Financial Sec- 
retary C. E. Levinson ; Treasurer, R. P. Lamdin ; Marshal, C. Voigt ; Surgeon, Dr. B. 
Shurtleff; Historian, F. L. Coombs. 

STANFORD PARLOR, NO. 76, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Stanford Parlor, No. 76, was so named in honor of the Governor, who is so very gener- 
ous in his endowments of California institutions and his several well-known acts of 
chanty. 

The Parlor wai instituted February 26, 1886, with the largest charter list ever submit- 
ted to the Grand and Subordinate Parlors for consideration. The membership at this 
date is 283 ; all representative young men of our community. The Parlor has made very 
substantial headway, both from a financial point of view and in point of numbers. 



The Past Presidents of the Parlor are: Brothers S. J. Taylor, Samuel Valleau, E. J. 
Casey, Chas. Cunningham, D. S. Jeffreys, H. C. Stilwell, E. J. Angelo, F. W. Covey, A. J. 
Raisch, C. E. Newman ; Trustees : J. H. Strehl, C. F. Breidenstein, Frank H, Powers. 

The officers for the present term are: President, Rich. J. Mier; First Vice-President, 
William Bannon ; Second Vice-President, E. L. Head ; Third Vice-President, A. J. Evans; 
Recording Secretary, Harrison Houseworth ; Financial Secretary, S. Shaen ; Treasurer, 
L. R. Ellert; Marshal, F. W. Cornyn ; Inside Sentinel, Jas. E. Hayden ; Outside Sentinel, 
H. J. Angelo ; Trustees : C. F. Breidenstein, Frank H. Powers. 

PRINCE PARLOR, NO. 80, ANGELS CAMP, CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Prince Parlor, No. 80, was instituted March 27, 1S86, by District Deputy Grand Presi- 
dent C. R. Rust, assisted by the officers of Excelsior Parlor, No. 31, and Calaveras Parlor, 
No. 67, with Norman Smith as Past President ; Frank R. Prince, President ; Chas. J. Cos- 
grove, First Vice-President ; Robert Gardner, Second Vice-President; Wm. Becker, Third 
Vice-President ; W. H. Irvine, Recording Secretary, and twenty-seven other charter mem- 
bers. 

The Parlor takes its name from its organizer and first President, Frank R. Prince. It 
is located in Angels Camp, in the mountains of Calaveras county, and is the banner Parlor 
of the county, having the largest membership (52) of the three Parlors in the county. It 
is in a flourishing condition financially and socially ; and its entertainments and parties 
are voted by all as successful and enjoyable affairs. Prince Parlor has sent a delegate to 
every Grand Parlor, and representatives to every Celebration, and has just purchased one 
of the most ornate and beautiful banners in the Order. 

The present officers are: Past President, C. D.Smith ; President, Albert Proethero ; 
First Vice-President, W. J. Lasswell; Second Vice-President, Wm. Loring; Third Vice- 
President, John Starr; Recording Secretary, Geo. F. Pache, M. D.; Financial Secretary,' 
W. H. Hooper, ; Treasurer, M. Arendt ; Marshal, Frank R. Leeper ; Inside Sentinel, John 
Peirano ; Outside Sentinel, Thos. Logamarcino ; Surgeon, Geo. F. Pache, M. D.; Trustees : 
C. W. Trvon, J. C. Davis. 




YERBA BUENA PARLOR, NO. 84, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Yerba Buena Parlor was instituted in San Francisco, April 8, 1886. Yerba Buena was the 
original name of the city of San Francisco. The present membership is eighty. The Par- 
lor meets every Tuesday evening in O. C. F. Hall, Alcazar building. 

The present officers are : Past President, W. S. O'Brien : President, C. B. Hobson ; 
First Vice-President, W. H. Souther; Second Vice-President, T. O. Heydenfeldt ; Third 
Vice-President, H. F. Konrad ; Recording Secretary, Fred W. Lees ; Financial Secretary, 
F. J. H. Manning; Treasurer, J. D. Abrams ; Marshal, M. J. Sheehan ; Surgeon, Dr. R. L 
Bowie ; Trustees : Daniel Suter, J. T. Hannes. David McKay, Jr. 






SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



KAY CITY PARLOR, NO. 104, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Bay City Tarlor. Xo. 104, meets at Friendship Hall, Odd Fellows' Building, corner of 
Seventh and Market streets, every Wednesday evening. This Parlor was instituted in the 
Alcazar Building on April 13, 1SS7, with a charter roll of forty-six members. A.Wiener 
was elected President, and II. L. Polack, Secretary. The members being imbued with a 
spirit of enthusiasm and energy, the membership increased rapidly ; and the Parlor soon 
rose to the foremost rank in the Order, a position which it has ever since maintained. At 
l lie present time it has a membership of 140, while its treasury contains about fifteen hun- 
dred dollars. 

Bav Citv Parlor is represented in the Board of Grand Officers by H. G. W. Dinkelspiel, 
who holds the office of Grand Inside Sentinel. This is Brother Dinkelspiel's second term, 
he having been Grand Outside Sentinel during the previous year. The Parlor's delegates 
at the last session of the Grand Parlor were Past Presidents E. W. Levy and Chas. Gross. 

The fortieth anniversary of California's admission into the Union will be celebrated 
by Bay City Parlor in an elaborate manner. The committee in charge has been untiring 
in its *effor*ts;and as a result several novel and attractive features will be presented both in 
the great parade and at the Mechanics' Pavilion, where the Parlor will have its head- 
quarters. 

The officers of the Bay City Parlor are : Senior Past Presidents, A. Wiener, Dr. M. Re- 
gensburger, S. J. Ackerraan, Chas. Gross, H. G. W. Dinkelspiel and E.W.Levy; Junior 
Past President, Geo. M. Cook; President, B. Frankenberg; First Vice-President, Sol. 
Reiser; Second Vice-President, David L. Hollub ; Third Vice-President, Chas. A. Lipman ; 
Recording Secretary, Seymour Gabriel; Financial Secretary, Leon E. Price; Treasurer. 
Dr. B. N. Gunzburger; Marshal, W. E. Letson ; Historian, S. Loverich ; Surgeon, Dr. M- 
Regensburger ; Trustees: Alex. Peiser, D. N. Davidson, and B. Bearwald ; Inside Sentinel, 
M. A. Bley ; Outside Sentinel, Wm. Carman ; Reading-room Directors, H. G. W. Dinkel- 
spiel, Sol. Peiser, and Seymour Gabriel. 

NIANTIC PARLOR, NO. 105. 

Niantic Parlor, No. 105, was instituted April 15, 1887, with M. H. Hernan as Past Presi- 
dent: A. J. Donovan, President, A. T. McCreery, Secretary, and about forty charter 
members. 

The Parlor takes its name from the ship Niantic, one of the first vessels that passed 
through the Golden Gate and anchored in the harbor of San Francisco. Niantic Parlor 
has now a membership of about one hundred, possesses two elegant banners, and carries 
a handsome National nag valued at $550. 

The present officers are: President, J. B. Paulsen; First Vice-President, Lewis F. 
Byington; Second Vice-President, T. C. Knowles; Third Vice-President, Joseph B. Keenan; 
Marshal, Frank Mordecai; Recording Secretary, James H. Purdy; Financial Secretary, 
J. F. Eggert; Treasurer, Miles G. Owens; Inside Sentinel, J. C. Freese; Outside Sentinel, 
G. T. Zowasky; Trustees: John B. Gartland, CD. Carter, C. W. Welch; Surgeon, H. Dam- 
kroeger, M. D. 

ARROWHEAD PARLOR, NO. no, SAN BERNARDINO. 

On July 20, 1887, District Deputy Grand President H. C. Katz, with fifteen visiting 
brothers Irom Los Angeles and Kamona Parlors, instituted Arrowhead Parlor, No. no, at 
San Bernardino. The meeting was an enthusiastic one; and the new Parlor was ushered 
into the Order under the most favorable auspices, there being a charter membership of 
thirty-seven, with District Deputy Rich as Past President, D. W. Fox, President, F. M. 
Towne, First Vice-President, G. L. Bryant, Recording Secretary, and W. A. Nash, 
Marshal. 



A more appropriate name could not have been selected, for it is taken from one of the 
old landmarks, — ever sacred to native sons, — which served to guide the footsteps of our 
fathers when they left their homes to explore this unknown region. An arrowhead spread 
out on the mountain side points downward to a place where bubble up innumerable hot 
springs. These hot springs, with their wonderful beacon, have been the theme for many 
a mystic romance among the Indians and early rettlers. 

Throughout the existence of Arrowhead Parlor, harmony and good fellowship have 
prevailed. The members have worked for the best interests of the Parlor ; and the offi- 
cers have been able and efficient. Perhaps no Parlor in the State is in a more flourishing 
condition, both financially and socially. The membership now exceeds fifty. A short 
time ago the Parlor was the recipient of a handsome banner from La Paloma Parlor, No. 
31, Native Daughters of the Golden West, which is prized yery highly. 

SAN. LUCAS PARLOR, NO. 115, SAN LUCAS. 

San Lucas Parlor, No. 115, was instituted November 5, 1887, by Grand Secretary Henry 
Lunstedt, assisted by members from Monterey, Santa Lucia and California Parlors. It 
began its existence with twenty charter members, and since that date has been steadily 
increasing, and now has a membership roll of over thirty. 

The Parlor takes its name from the town in which it is located, in the upper Salinas 
valley, Monterey county, and at present is in a flourishing condition, both financially and 
socially. Many of its members travel over thirty miles to attend its meetings; but never- 
theless they are very enthusiastic. San Lucas Parlor has attended every Celebration since 
its organization, and all of its members take a general interest in the work of the Order. 

The present officers are: Past President, J. Alonzo Forbes; President, R. Diaz; First 
Vice-President, Chas. Hart, Second Vice-President, Eugene Vance; Third Vice-President, 
L. P. Chaboya; Secretary, J. A. Trescony; Treasurer, John McDougall; Marshal, A. C 
Vance. 

NATIONAL PARLOR, NO. 118, SAN FRANCISCO. 

National Parlor, No. 118, was instituted on January 12, 1SS8, with sixty-one members. 
The nucleus of the Parlor was obtained from several companies of the National Guard 
of California located in San Francisco; and among its members are several prominent 
National Guard officers. The membership is constantly increasing, and now numbers 175. 
The treasury is in a solid financial condition. The Parlor is possessed of an elegant ban- 
ner, of which the members are justly proud. The eminent success of the Parlorl is due to 
the energetic efforts of each | individual member, and particularly to the "Tourists," 
a social organization composed exclusively of the members of National Parlor. The 
headquarters of the Parlor during the Celebration will be at Union Square Hall, 421 Post 
street. 

The present officers are: Past President, George W. Hupers; President, Henry Koch; 
First Vice-President, Peter G. du Py; Second Vice-President, W. N. Cumins; Third Vice- 
President, Walter S. Grattan; Recording Secretary; George W. Koch, Jr.; Financial Sec- 
retary, Charles W. Heyer; Treasurer, Albert Knorp; Marshal, Herman Huber; Inside 
Sentinel, J. H. Von Staden; Outside Sentinel, John W- Akmann; Trustees, W. B. Lar- 
kins, W. S. Stokes, M. C. Cantelow; Surgeon, Dr. Henry W. Dodge; Historian, John T. 
Dispaux. 

LOS GATOS PARLOR, NO. 124, LOS GATOS. 

Los Gatos Parlor was instituted March 23, 1888, by District Deputy Grand President W. 
B. Rucker, Grand Secretary Henry Lunstedt, and Grand Trustee J. W. Ahern, with Geo. 
D. Wilson as Past President, G. S. McMurtry as President, Fen. Massol as Secretary, and 
nineteen other charter members. 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



59 



The Parlor takes its name from the town in which it is located, in the foothills of 
Santa Clara county, and at present is in a nourishing condition financially and socially, 
with thirty-two members on its roll. Los Gatos Parlor has attended every Celebration 
since its organization, and carries one of the most unique and beautiful banners in the 
Order, which was presented to it by the ladies of Los Gatos, August 31, iSSS. 

The present officers are: Junior Tast President, Geo. R. Emerson ; President, Frank 
F. Watkins; First Vice-President, Wm. C. Swinford ; Second Vice-President, \Vm. A. 
Riggs ; Third Vice-President, Robert D. Baker ; Financial Secretary, H. Bates Emerson ; 
Recording Secretary, Fen. Massol : Treasurer, Geo. D. Wilson ; Marshal, Robt. L.Hutch- 
inson ; Inside Sentinel, IL R. Roberts ; Outside Sentinel, Wm. B. Griffith ; Trustees: E. 
C. Yocco L. C. Trailer, and T. F. Hunter. 



MADERA PARLOR, NO. 130, MADERA, FRESNO COUNTY. 

President, George B. Simpson; First Vice-President, John H. Grace; Second Vice-Presi- 
dent, John McComb; Third Vice-President, Wm. H. Greeley; Recording Secretary, J. II. 
Stoutenborough, Jr.; Financial Secretary, J. H. Stoutenborough, Jr.; Marshal, James II. 
Edwards; Treasurer, George W. Donahue; Inside Sentinel, C. E. Sharp; Outside Sentinel, 
J. D. Green; Trustees, John George, John McComb, James H. Edwards. 

ALCATRAZ PARLOR, NO. 145, SAN FRANCISCO. 

This Parlor was instituted in San Francisco on July 24, 1890, with a membership of 
forty, by Grand Vice-President Wm. H. Miller (acting Grand President), assisted by Past 
Grand President M. A. Dorn, Grand Trustee R. M. Fitzgerald, Grand Secretary Henry 
Lunstedt, District Deputy Grand Presidents, A. J. Brunner, J. R. Howell, Chas. Gross, A. 
T. McCreery, David Cummings, and the following acting Grand Officers: Grand Vice- 
President Leon Dennery, Columbia, No. 121 ; Grand Marshal, C. R. Havens, Yerba 
Buena, No. 84; Grand Orator, F. H. Dunn, Columbia, No. 121; Grand Inside Sentinel, 
Chas. R. Heverin, San Francisco, No. 49; Grand Outside Sentinel, J. B. Stovall, California, 
No. 1 ; Grand Trustees, Lyman Green, O. H. Westphall, J. H. Lyons. Chas. L. Weller 
was elected President and Thos. F. McDermott Secretary. It is composed of good mate- 
rial, some of the members being old and experienced in the work of the Order. It has at 
present a membership of one hundred and is steadily increasing, having a healthy treas- 
ury and being clear of all indebtedness. Its name, Alcatraz, is taken from'the island of Alca- 
traz in San Francisco Bay. 

The officers for the present term are as follows : Past President, H. M. Campe ; Presi- 
dent, Jas. L. Gallagher ; First Vice-President, Chas. H. Turner ; Second Vice-President, W. 
W. Hewitt ; Third Vice-President, E. P. Troy ; Recording Secretary, Thos. F. McDermott ; 
Financial Secretary, Fisk L. Parker ; Treasurer, George Lacombe ; Marshal, Wm. Hora- 
bin ; Surgeon, A. ~K. Hapersberg ; Outside Sentinel, H. B. Cady ; Inside Sentinel, H. 
Litchenstein ; Trustees: Walter J. Wolf, Frank J. Pippey, Harry W. Brown. 

The Parlor meets every Wednesday evening at Alcazar Building, No. 114 O'Farrell 
street. 



Marysville, No. 6, Marysville. 
Stockton, No. 7, Stockton. 
Argonaut, No. 8, Oroville. 
Placerville, No. 9, Placerville. 
Modesto, No. ii, Modesto. 
Humboldt, No. 14, Eureka. 



Mt. Lassen, No. 15, Red Bluff. 
Amador, No. 17, Sutter Creek 
Visalia, No. 19, Visalia. 
Arc at a, No. 20, Areata. 
Chico, No. 21, Chico. 
San Jose, No. 22, San Jose. 



Yosemite, No. 24, Merced. 

Sunset, No. 26, Sacramento. 

Bear Flag, No. 27, Petaluma. 

Western Star, No. 28, Santa Rosa. 

Woodland, No. 30, Woodland. 

Excelsior, No. 31, Jackson. 

Ione, No. 33, lone. 

Mt. Shasta, No. 35, Shasta. 

Manzanita, No. 36, Anderson. 

Hanfokd, No. 37, Hanford. 

Solano, No. 39, Suisun 

Rainbow, No. 40, Wheatland. 

Elk Grove, No. 41, Elk Grove. 

Baker, No. 42, Bakersfield. 

Tulare, No. 43, Tulare City. 

Fremont, No. 44, Hollister. 

Los Angeles, No. 45, Los Angeles. 

Alta. No. 46, Mokelumne Hill. 

Alameda, J>o. 47, Alameda. 

Plymouth, No. 48, Plymouth. 

San Francisco, No. 49, San Francisco 

Oakland, No. 50, Oakland. 

El Dorado, No. 52, San Francisco. 

St. Helena, No. 53, St. Helena. 

Gridlev, No. 54, Gridley. 

Yuba, No. 55, Smartsville. 

Golden Fleece, No. 57, Brownsville. 

Auburn, No. 59, Auburn. 

Dixon, No. 60, Dixon. 

Los Osos, No. 61, San Luis Obispo. 

Silver Star, No. 63, Lincoln. 

Mt. TAMALrAis. No. 64, San Rafael. 

Watsonville, No. 65, Watsouville. 

Redwood, No. 66, Redwood City. 

Calaveras, No. 67, San Andreas. 

Sotoyome, No. 68, Healdsburg. 

Colusa, No. 69, Colusa. 

Sutter, No. 70, Yuba City. 

Uriah, No. 71, Ukiah. 

Rincon, No. 72, San Francisco. 

Porterville, No. 73, Porterville. 

Invincible, No. 74, Anaheim. 

Monterey, No. 75, Monterey. 

Vallejo, No. 77, Vallejo. 

Friendship, No. 78, Camptonville. 

Redwood Grove, No. 79, Guernevillc. 

Gilroy, No. 81, Gilroy. 

Palo Alto, No. 83, San Jose. 

Granite, No. 83. Folsom. 

Sierra, No. 85, Forest Hill. 

McLane, No. 56, Ca'lstoga. 

Mt. Bally, No. by, Weaverville. 

Golden Star, No. 88, Rolmerville. 

Benicia, No. 89, Benicia. 

Santa Cruz, No. 90, Santa Cruz. 

Georgetown, No. 91, Georgetown. 



Downieville, No. 92, Downieville. 
Ferndale, No. 93, Ferndale. 
Golden Nugget, No. 94, Sierra City. 
Sj:aside, No. 95, Half Moon Bay. 
Las Positas, No. 96, Livcrmore. > 
Santa Lucia, No. 97, Salinas City. 
Meridian, No. 98, Nord. 
Lassen, No. 99, Susanville. 
Mt. Diablo, No. ioi, Martinez. 
Glen Ellen, No. 102, Glen Ellen. 
Silver Tip, No. 103, Vacaville. 
Courtland, No. 106, Courtland. 
Selma, No. 107, Selma. 
San Diego, No. 108, San Diego. 
Ramona, No. 109, Los Angeles. 
Sonoma, No. hi, Sonoma. 
Marin, N0..112, Tomales. 
Eden, No. i 13, Haywards. 
Cabrillo, No. 114, Ventura. 
Santa Barbara, No. 116, Santa Barbara. 
Broderick, No. 117. roiut Arena. 
Eagle, No. 119, Cloverdale. 
Piedmont, No. 120, Oakland. 
Columbia, No. 121, San Francisco. 
Paso Robles, No. 122, Paso Robles. 
Nitomo, No. 123, Nipomo. 
Willows, No. 125, Willows. 
Mountain, No. 126, Dutch Flat. 
Wisteria, No. 127, Alvarado. 
Santa Maria, No. 12S, Santa Maria. 
Najoqui, No. 129, Lompoc. 
Ouincy, No. 131, Quincy. 
Gaeilan, No. 132, Castroville. 
Highland, No. 133, French Gulch. 
Sconchin, No. 134, Alturas. 
Arroyo Grande, No. 135, Arroyo Grande. 
Mt. Whitney-, No. 136, independence. 
Hesperian, No. 137, San Francisco. 
Hornitos, No. 138, Horuitos. 
Chispa, No. 139, Murphy's Camp. 
Central, No. 740, Walnut Creek. 
Inyo, No. 141, Bishop Creek. 
Oakdale, No. 142, Oakdale. 
Sebastapol, No. 143, Sebastapol. 
Tuolumne, No. 144. Sonora. 
Halcy - on, No. 146, Alameda. 
L.vkeport, No. 147, I.akeport. 
Maxwell, No. 148, Maxwell. 
McCloud, No. 149, Redding. 
San Marcos, No. rso. San Miguel. 
Brooklyn, No. 151, East Oakland. 
Cambria, No. 152, Cambria. 
Davisville, No. 153, Davisville. 
Alcalde, No. 154, San Francisco. 
Cayucos, No. 155, Cayucos. 
Yontockett, No. 156, Crescent City. 



JOINT COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS, N. S. G. W. 



This work is issued as a souvenir of the celebration in San Francisco, by the Native 
Sons of the Golden West, of the fortieth anniversary of the admission of the State of 
California into the Union. This event marks an important epoch in the history of the 
State and of the Order of Native Sons of the Golden West ; and in view of that fact the 
order determined that its annual celebration should this year be held in San Francisco, 
and should exceed in grandeur and extent any celebration of a similar character ever 
before seen on the Pacific Coast. This caused the task of making the necessary prepa- 
rations to devolve upon the eighteen parlors located in this city; and how well they 
performed their work is attested by the magnificent success of the celebration, which is 
unquestionably the largest, grandest and most enthusiastic ever held within the confines 
of our State. 

On the 5th day of May last, Grand President William H. Miller sent to the Parlors of 
this city the following circular: 

C. P. Circular No. i. 

GRAND PARLOR NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 
Wm. H. Miller, Grand Presidtnt, 1723 Sutter Street 

San Francisco, May 5, 1890. 

To the Officers and Members of Parlor, No.— N. S. G. W. : 

Brothers — The coming anniversary of the admission of our State into the Union 
being an important event in its history, the Grand Parlor, which lately convened at Chico, 
deemed it advisable for the best interests of our order that the celebration thereof take 
place in the City of San Francisco, and as much of the future prosperity of the order of the 
Native Sons of the Golden West will depend on the success of this celebration, you are 
hereby requested to appoint from among your number a committee of five active working 
members to meet with like committees from the parlors in San Francisco, at their library 
and reading rooms, on Tuesday evening, May 13, at 8:00 o'clock, to take such steps as may 
be advisable for the proper celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the birth of our grand 
California. Yours fraternally, 

Wm. H. Miller, 

Grand President. 

Seventy-two representatives assembled at the time and place mentioned in the com- 
munication, and much enthusiasm was manifested. It was decided to effect a permanent 
organization and to immediately begin the work of preparation. The name "Joint 
Committee of Arrangements, N. S. G. W., Admission Day Celebration," was adopted, and 
it was determined to meet every Friday evening until after the celebration. The grand 
officers of the order and all Past Grand Presidents residing in San Francisco were added 
to the committee. The following officers were chosen: Chairman, Col. W. H. Chamberlain, 
of Pacific Parlor, No. 10; Vice-chairman, W. H. Metson, of El Dorado Parlor, No. 52; 
Secretary, R. P. Doolan, of Hesperian Parlor, No. 137; Assistant Secretary, E. G. Du Py, 
of National Parlor, No. 118; Treasurer, J. P. Dockery, of California Parlor, No. 1. In the 
selection of these officers the committee was singularly fortunate, for men better fitted for 
the positions could not have been obtained. The Chairman proved himself to be possessed 
of vast executive ability and rare good judgment, and in both of these qualities was ably 
seconded by the Vice-chairman. Both have been untiring in their efforts to insure the 
success of the celebration, and no sacrifice was deemed by them too great to make to 
achieve that object. The Secretary devoted his entire time and attention to the great 
amount of work which devolved upon him, and performed the same in a manner which 
earned for him unstinted praise. The Treasurer also devoted considerable time, since May 
last, in attending to his duties, and kept his accounts of receipts and disbursements in a 
thorough and systematic manner. The Chairman was empowered to appoint what sub- 
committees he deemed necessary, and at the second meeting of the joint committee 
announced the following: 



COMMITTEES. 



A udiling. 
P. G. DU PY W. H. METSON 

T. W. DOYLE GEO. LACOMBE 

W. H. THORNLEY 

Halls and Headquarters. 
C. A. BOLDEMANN R. C. MITCHELL 

G. W. HUPERS J. D. ABRAMS 

C. A. LIPMAN 

Hotels and Accommodations. 



F. W. COVEY 

DR. E. F. DENTLER 
JOHN A. BOYTER 
B. FRANKENBURG 

G. M. MARTIN 



F. J. CLAUSEN 
HENRY S. MARTIN 
JOHN MCEVOY 
T. P. LEONARD 
J. W. THORNLEY 



J. B. GARTLAND 
Entertainment. 



E. F. BERT 

DR. D. D. LUSTIG 

WM. M. JOSEPHI 

J. TIBBITS 

A. F. SCHLEICHER 



J. B. GARTLAND 
A. D. OWENS 
R. H. ANDREWS 
R. C. MITCHELL 
E. J. ANGELO 



T. J. HARRIS. 
Excursion. 



F. W. LEES 
GEO. LACOMBE 
H. H. GOETGEN 
R. J. WALLIS 
W. F. GILCHRIST 



F. D. HOOPER 
DR. D. D. LUSTIG 
A. EBERHART 

D. C. MARTIN 

E. W. LEVY 



E. ALEXANDER 



Parade. 



W. H. THORNLEY 
E. N. SNOOK 
JOHN R. KROPP 
GEO. A. MONTELL 
J. P. DONOVAN 



D. C. MARTIN 
DANIEL SUTER 
L. F. BYINGTON 
LOUIS STROHMEIER 
R. H. ANDREWS 



C. L. TILDEN 



Music. 



CHAS. GROSS 
E. F. COLLINS 



DR. E. F. DENTLER 
DR.W. H. MCLAUGHLIN 



M. A. DORN 

Decorations. 
LEO F. HAMPTON W. S. GRATTAN 

S. SHAEN T. F. McDERMOTT 

DR. C. W. DECKER 



Carriages and Local Transportation. 
CHAS. MAASS J. O'CONNELL 

C. H. CONNELL B. P. HUBBS 

H. S. MARTIN 



Press. 



J. T. GREANY JAS. COAKLEY 

G. GUNZENDORFER DANIEL SUTER 
R. M. FITZGERALD 

Bulletins. 
JAS. I. BOLAND M. A. DORN 

EUGENE W. LEVY JOHN H. GRADY 

HENRY LUNSTEDT 

Souvenir. 
J. J. KENNEDY JOHN A. STEINBACH 

DR. W. H. MCLAUGHLIN E. N. SNOOK 
M. L. MCCORD 



Grand Ball. 



T. L. KEHRLEIN 
A. EBERHART 

E. J, ANGELO 
J. T. DISPAUX 

F. H. DUNNE 

J. P. 



GEO. A. MONTELL 
T. W. DOYLE 
HENRY LUNSTEDT 
H. G. W. DINKELSPIEL 
C. H. CONNELL 
DONOVAN 



Badges and Regalias. 
F. FINN DAVID McKAY. Jr. 

. L. STROHMEIER SOL BLOOM 
JOHN A. BOYTER 



Pavilion. 



J. E. MCDOUGALD 
B. J. KILLILEA 
M. L. MCCORD 
W. H. METSON 
J. B. PAULSEN 



E. T. DWYER 
GEO. W. HUPERS 

F. H. DUNNE 
JOHN A. STEINBACH 
H. G. W. DINKELSPIEL 



D. W. SULLIVAN 
Printing. 
A. T. MCCREERY L. K. HAGENKAMP 

WM. MCPHERSON T. W. HOBSON 

B. J. KILLILEA 

Literary Exercises. 
J. R. HOWELL E. P. E. TROY 

J. W. THORNLEY G. H. PIPPY 

DR. C. W. DECKER 

Pioneers. 
W. H. MILLER DR. C. W. DECKER 

JOHN H. GRADY M. A. DORN 

JOHN A. STEINBACH R. P. HAMMOND. Jr. 

Native Daughters. 
GEO. H. PIPPY WM. H. MILLER 

JAS. I. BOLAND J. E. MCDOUGALD 

G. GUNZENDORFER 

Invitation. 

W. H, METSON G. W. HUPERS 

T. J. HARRIS LEO. F. HAMPTON 

DR. W. H. MCLAUGHLIN 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



61 



Finance. 

CHAS. F. CROCKER. Chairman 
R. P. HAMMOND, Vice-Chairman 
J. H. HEGLER. Acting Vice-Chairman 
H. DUNNE, Secretary 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 



ACKERMAN, S. J. 
ANDERSON. O. W. 
BARRY, J. W. 
BARTON. W. H. 
BOXTON, DR. CHAS. 
BOYD, J. C, JR. 
BRUCE, C. C. 
BRUNT, W. N. 
BURNS, T. P. 
BYJNGTON, L. F. 
CAMPBELL. I. T. 
CARTER, C. D. 
CASTLE, A. E. 
CLARK, GEORGE D. 
COLEMAN, LOUIS 
CROCKER, H. J. 
DECKER, C. W. 
D1NKEI.SPEIL, J. L. 
D1SPAUX, JOHN T. 
DOANE. THOMAS 
DOOLAN, F. T. 
DKYDEN, G. H. S. 
DUNKER, JOHN A. 
FEIGENBAUM, L. B. 
FLYNN. J. J. 
FORTMAN, H. F. 
FREDERICK. W. A. 
FREIERMUTH. GEO. 



KENNEDY, A. \V. 
KENNY, JOHN J. 
KING. F.'R. 
KNORP, A. 
KOSTER, I. A. 
LACOMBE. GEORGE 
LANGLEY. CHAS. L. 
LARROCHE, JOHN M. 
LEES, FRED'W. 
LEVINGSTON, I. 
LORSBACH, A. 
LOWELL, GEORGE P. 
LYONS. JAMES H. 
MARTIN, H. S. 
MATHEWSON, W. N. 
MCEVOY. JOHN J. 
MINOR, T. H. 
MOODY, F. S. 
MORSE, DR. |. F. 
PHELAN. JAMES D. 
PIPPY. GEORGE H. 
POULTNEY, T. G. 
READ. C. C. 
REAVY, JAMES 
REIS, JOHN O. 
REMINGTON. H. W. 
RHEINFELD, JAMES 
ROGERS. F. N. 



GALLAGHER. HENRY ROTHSCHILD. JOS. 
GRADY, JOHN H. SIEBE, JOHN F. 

GRIFFING, F. A. SIMON. A. M. 

GUNZBURGER.DR.B.M. SOULE, W. F. 
HAMMERSMITH. J. A. SQUIRES. F. R 



HAMPTON, LEO 
HARRIGAN, J. J. 
HEARST. W. R. 
HEVEKIN, C. R. 
HIGGINS. C. C. 
H1LLMAN. J. R. 
HOARE, J. H. 
HUBER, O. 
HUNTEMANN. D. A. 
JENNINGS, GEORGE 
JONES, WILLIAM 
KAHN, WILLIAM 



WIELAND, R. P. 



STANLEY, CHAS. T. 
STARR, GEORGE A. 
STAUDE, F. 
SULLIVAN. D. W. 
SULSBERG. WM. F. 
SWAIN, F. A. 
TAYLOR. SAMUEL J. 
TIBBITTS, F. A. 
TROY, E. P. E. 
VALLEAU, SAMUEL 
WELCH, C. W. 
WELLER, CHAS. L. 



J. F. FINN 
FRED W. LEES 

R. C. MITCHELL 



Regalia. 

E. W. WILLIAMS 
J. R. HOWELL 



Night Parade. 
L. K. HAGENKAMP J. T. DISPAUX 
I. J. KENNEDY J. E. POMEROY 

E. F. BERT F. R. VASLIT 

JAMES BURNS 

Special Invitation. 

C. F. CROCKER J. D. ABRAMS 

W. H. METSON R. P. HAMMOND, JR. 

R. M. FITZGERALD 

Decoration — Sh ipping. 

CAPT. HENRY BINGHAM CAPT. A. C. FREESE 

CAPT. MARTIN BULGER 

Regatta— Yachting. 
J. M. SHOTWELL W. A. SPRINGER 

C. G. YALE G. F. SMITH 

J M. PEW K. H. CATTON 

W. R. MELVILLE 

Reception. 
R. P. HAMMOND, Ir. A. RAHWYLER 
R. P. DOOLAN J. W. BARRY 

COL J. D.STEPHENSON GEO. K. LIDDLE 



ARTHUR KLUMPP 
SAMUEL W. DIXON 
BRYAN J KILL1LEA 
W. I. GUILFOYLE 
PHILIP J. HASKINS 
CHAS. H. MAASS 
JOHN P. HETTRICH 
R. J. MIER 
C. P. HOBSON 
BEN FRANKENBURG 
J. B. PAULSEN 
HENRY KOCH 
J. K. HOWELL 
FRED. A. WA1BEL 
JAS. L. GALLAGHER 

W. K. JOHNSON 
And a number not yet named. 



HEN'Y KLOPPENSTINE 
J. A. BURK1NGTON 
F. J. MURASKY 
JOHN FEENASY 
JOSEPH H. CUMMINC. 
A. RUEF 
J. H HILLMAN 
H. H. ABRAMS 
T. KNOWLES 
ALBERT KNORP 
L. S. ROSENBERG 
H. W. FURLONG 
FREDERICK H. HYER 
L. A. GIACOBBI 
IAMES M. BURNS 



The Chairman of the Joint Committee was made ex officio a member of each of these 
committees. 

In the selection of these committees Col. Chamberlain exercised rare good judgment, 
carefully canvassing each member's qualifications, and placing him upon the committee 
to the duties of which he was best adapted. Under the direction of their chairmen these 
sub-committees actively began the work to which they were assigned ; and, without 
exception, performed it in a most satisfactory manner. The Auditing Committee carefully 
scrutinized every bill presented; and none were approved until they were satisfied it had 
been properly incurred. It also iuspected from time to time the books of the Finance 
Committee. The Halls and Headquarters Committee assumed the arduous task of pro- 
viding quarters for all the Parlors participating in the celebration; and, for the purpose 
of better performing this work, shortly after its appointment formed a union with the 
Pavilion Committee, which was appointed to supervise the interior arrangement of the 
Mechanics' Pavilion, and apportion its space among the Parlors desiring to have their 



headquarters there. The Committee on Hotels and Accommodations made a tour of all 
the hotels and secured from them special rates for visiting brothers and their friends; 
and also completed a list of the private houses in which rooms could be rented. The 
Entertainment Committee made all the arrangements for the elaborate entertainments 
offered during the three days. The Excursion Committee chartered the four steamers for 
the excursion round the bay on September 10, and attended to all the minor details 
necessary to secure the comfort and entertainment of the excursionists. The Committee 
on Parade, acting in conjunction with the Grand Marshal, arranged all the details of the 
grand procession held on the 9th. The Music Committee secured the bands which filled 
the air with melody during the festivities without causing strife between union and 
non-union musicians. The Committee on Decoration wisely expended over ten thousand 
dollars in placing the city in holiday attire and in decorating the interior of the Pavilion. 
The Carriage and Local Transportation Committee contracted for the carriages used in 
the parade. The Committee on Press kept the interior papers informed of the progress 
of the preparations being made by the city members, and looked after the comfort of the 
rural scribes on their advent into the city. The Bulletin Committee supervised the 
circulars issued by the various committees and prepared and issued the official bulletin. 
The Souvenir Committee supervised the production of this little work which modestly 
obtrudes itself on your notice. The Committee on Grand Ball, as its name suggests, had 
entire charge of that grand affair, selecting the floor manager, assistants and reception 
committee, as well as designing the handsome souvenir programme issued to the guests. 
The Badge and Regalia Committee designed and procured the regalias worn by the 
Marshal and aids in the pirade. and the badges of the joint committee. The Printing 
Committee obtained the bids and awarded the contracts tor the large amount of printing 
necessary for the committees to have done. The Committee on Literary Exercises had 
full charge of the entertainment given in the Grand Opera House on the 9th, selecting 
the officers, speakers, talent and music which participated therein. The Committee on 
Pioneers waited upon that organization and secured its hearty cooperation for making 
the celebration a success. The Invitation Committee selected the list of guests invited to 
participate in the parade and exercises. The Committee on Native Daughters arranged 
for the participation of that order in the festivities. The Regatta Committee arranged for 
the boat and yacht races on the bay on the 8th of September. The Committee on Torch- 
light Parade had charge of the arrangements for the parade held on Saturday evening 
which ushered in the festivities. The Special Committee on Invitation was appointed 
for the purpose ot inviting President Harrison, Governor Waterman and Mayor Pond to 
participate in the celebration. Their wishes were conveyed to the President on an elegant 
gold card designed and presented to the committee by a public-spirited jeweler of this 
city, and to the Governor and Mayor on handsomely designed satin cards. The Special 
Committee on Shipping Decorations consisted of three ex-sea captains, not members of 
the Order, who generously volunteered to interviw the captains of the vessels in the 
harbor and induce them to decorate in honor of the occasion. The Special Committee on 
Yacht Regatta also consisted of gentlemen not members of the Order who are well and 
favorably known in yachting circles, and who tendered their services and experience to 
assist the regular committee having that affair in charge. The Finance Committee, which 
was probably the most important of the sub-committees, and had the heaviest task 
imposed upon it, did its work nobly; and by its efforts made possible the holding of the 
celebration on a scale of magnificence at first hardly thought possible. The Reception 
Committee attended to receiving the delegations from the various interior Parlors and 
their friends on their arrival in the city, and escorted them to their quarters. 

While each of the committees attended to the work assigned to it, yet they all worked 
together, like the machinery of a clock, in one harmonious whole. At the weekly meetings 
of the Joint Committee the subordinate committees presented written reports of the 
progress they had made in their work, and received from the general body instructions as 
to how they should continue. By this system of procedure every member of the Joint 
Committee was kept informed of doings of the various committees, and the general body 
exercised supervision of the entire work. It was in this manner, only, that arrangements 
of such vast proportions and diversified character could be successfullj- managed ; and to 
the strict adherence to this system is the order of Native Sons of the Golden West indebted 
or the great success which has crowned its efforts. 



62 



SOUVENIR OF THE NATIVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



Following is a complete list of the members who constituted the Joint Committee of 



Arrangements: 

John 11. Crad; 

CtkinA Officers, 

Wm. II Miller, G. P. 

R.M.FiUgermld.G.V.P 
Henry Lunstedt, G. S. 

Henry S. Martin. G.T. 

las. I. Boland, r. i >. 
Chas. T.. Tilden.G. M. 
lohn T. Greany.G T. 
\v. H. Thornley, G. T. 
ll. G. W. DinkeJspiel, 
G. 1.8. 

California, No. i. 
Dr. E. F. Dentler 
J. P, Dockery 

Chas. A. BoUiemann 
Dr. D. D. I.ustig 
John E. McDougald 

Pacific, No. io. 
Thos. W. Doyle 

Wm. H. Chamberlain 
John R. Kropp 
C. F. Crocker 
T. J. Harris 

Golden Gate, No. 29. 

A. Eberhart 

B. J. Killilea 
Chas. H. Connell 
T. 1*. Leonard 
E. Alexander 



Past Grand 

John A. Stcinbach. 

Mission, No. 38. 
Dr w. 11. McLaughlin 
Eugene P. Hert 
Robert C. Mitchell 
M. I.. McCord 
J. J. Kennedy 

San Francisco, No. 49. 
Wm. H. McPherson 
John W. Thornley 
Win. M. Josephi 
Louis Strohmeier 
John O. Connell 

El Dorado, No. $2. 
W. H. Metson 
J. A. Boyter 
Chas. Maass 
H. Goetjen 
G. Gunzendorfer 

Rincon, No. 72. 
J. P. Donovan 
J. F. Finn 

D. W. Sullivan 

L. K. Hagenkamp 

E. A. Tibbits 

Stanford, No. 76. 
Sam'l Shaen 

E. J. Angelo 
D. C. Martin 

A. F. Schleicher 

F. W. Covey 



A uditing. 
P. G. Du Py. 

Halls and Head- 
quarters. 
C. A. Boldemann. 

Hotels and Accom- 
modations. 
F. W. Covey. 
Entertainment. 
E. F. Bert. 

Excursions. 

Fred. W. Lees. 

Parade. 

W. H. Thornley. 



Presidents. 
Dr. Chas. W. Decker. 

Verba Buena, No. 84. 
Fred. W. Lees 
Daniel Suter 
David McKay, Jr. 
C. B. Hobson 
Jos. D. Abrams 

Bay City, No. 104. 
Sol. Bloom 
C. A. Lipman 
B. Frankenberg 
Chas. Gross 
Eugene W. Levy 

Nianlic, No. 105. 
A. T. McCreery 
R. J. Willis 
J. B. Gartland 
J. B. Paulsen 
L. F. Byington 

National, No. 118. 
Geo. W. Hupers 

E. N. Snook 
P. G. Du Py 
J. T. Dispaux 
W. S. Grattan 

Columbia, No. 121. 
Wm. Gilchrist 

F. H. Dunne 

G. M. Martin 
A. D. Owens 
J. R. Howell 



M. A. Dorn. 

Hesperian, No. 737. 
R. P. Doolau 
Leo F. Hampton 
Geo. A. Montell 
F. J. Clausen 
F. D. Hooper 

Alcatraz, No. 14s . 
T. F. McDermott 
Geo. Lacombe 
R. P. Hammond, Jr. 
Geo. H. Pippy 
E. P. E. Troy 

Alcalde, No. 154. 
Jos. L. Kehrlein 
Jas. Coakley 
R. H. Andrews 
B. I. Hubbs 
E. F. Dwyer 

South S. F., No. 157. 
John McEvoy 
Jos. H. Hoare 
L. Nounneman 
James Burns 
John Law Roche 

Sequoia, No. 160. 
E. F. Collins 
Frank H. Vaslit 
A. J. Dheilig 
J. E. Pomeroy 
S. A. White 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES. 



Music. 
Chas. Gross. 

Decorations. 
Leo. F. Hampton. 

Carriages and Local 

Transportation. 

C. Maass. 

Press. 
J. T. Greany. 

Pi inting. 
A. T. McCreery. 

Invitation. 
W. H. Metson. 



Finance. 

C. F. Crocker. 

Vice-Chairman, R. P. 

Hammond, Jr. 

Reception . 
R. P. Hammond, Jr. 

Bulletins. 
Jas. I. Boland. 

Souvenir. 
J. J.Kennedy. 

Grand Ball. 
J. L. Kehrlein. 



Badges and Regalia. 
J. F. Finn. 

Pavilion. 
J. E. McDougall. 

Literary Exercises. 
J. R. Howell. 

Pioneers. 
Wm. H. Miller. 

Native Daughters. 
Geo. H. Vippy. 

Regatta. 
J. F. Finn. 



WATE^HOUSE St HESTER, 



-IMPORTERS OF 



Wagon Lumber and Carriage Material, 

16 to 22 Beale Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 

/jcj Front Street, New York. yog to 715 J St., Sacramento. 



j. s. SWAN. 



M. STEIN. 



SWflfl. THE PRINTER, 

759 

MARKET STREET, 
SKfi FRANCISCO, CAMFOf*rim. 

INCORPORATED 1881. TELEPHONE. 3135 PURE MOUNTAIN ICE. 

URI0R T^K 60MPABY 

Y Y Y Y Y . Y Y -A- ^^^^ --""■*■ YYYTT YYTTT 

Office, 735 & 737 Fourth Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Works located at Prosser Creek, Boca, Cuba ^ San Francisco. 



▲ A 



AGENTS IN ALL PRINCIPAL TOWNS ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 



▼ ▼ 
NOTICE.— SPECIAL RATES TO LARGE CONSUMERS. 



SOUVENfR OF THE NATfVE SONS OF THE GOLDEN WEST. 



Union Iron Works. 



Works Potrero. 

Office Corner First and Mission Streets. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



The only Builders of Iron and Steel Vessels on the Pacific Coast. 



BUILDERS OF 



CHARLESTON, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
MONTEREY and 
CRUISER No 6, unnamed 



FOR THE U. S. NAVY. 



FINEST HYDRAULIC LIFTING DOCK IN THE UNITED STATES. 



MINING MACHINERY A SPECIALTY. 



San Francisco Breweries, 



LIMITED, 
'oitvpriaiwj 

The John Wieland Brewing Company, 

The Fredericksburg Brewing Company, 

The United States Brewing Company, 

The Chicago Brewing Company, 

The Willows Brewery, 

The South San Francisco Brewery, 

The Pacific Brewery, 

The Brooklyn Brewery of Brooklyn, 

The Hoiburg Brewery of Berkeley. 



OFFICE, 403 MARKET ST , S. W. cor. of Fremont. 
Telephone No. 1150. 



WM. ALVORD, President. E. A. DENICKE, Manager. E. R. SCHCLZ, Secretary. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 

William Alvord, J. H. Wieland, S. G. Murphy, H. Dutard, E. A. Denicke. 



Huntington Hopkins Company, 

18 TO 24 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, ^sm^ CALIFORNIA. 



NORWALK CYLINDER LOCKS. 




FINE BRONZE GOODS. 



HIGH * -A.RT * HARDWARE 

KOR RBSIDKXCBS, CHURCHES, F»lXBZvIO BUDL/DINGS, 



(J* 



* ^ 



1 




See the " Caligraph Special No. 3," now on exhibition. 

CHAS E, KAYLOR, General Agent and Dealer in Type-Writer Supplies, 

725 Market Street, history building, San Francisco 



k \€depWe'328 ^7 lO P OIK Sto War Market? % 
§ .^K SAN FRANCISCO. % 



^CHtflROH 






<^LASS -BJGKDINQ, BMI3GSSINQ AND STAINING-. 

PLAIN and ORNAMENTAL GLAZING. 



fl imflam, carrigan & H apten Go. 

Incorporated February 7th, 1888. 

17 & 19 Beale Street, 18, 20, 22, 24 Main Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

IMPORTERS OF 

HHRDMKRE 

Iron. Steel arid Brass Goods, 

Railroad, Mining and Mill Supplies. 

Iron Pipe. Tubes. Fittings, etc. 



New York Office 107 Chambers Street. 



GEOC-SHREVE-&.-C9- 

• GOLD AND SILVER SMITHS ; 

IMPORTERS OF 

•DIAMONDS- PRECIOUS STONES- WATCHES • JEWELRY- CLOCKS- 
BRONZES FINE PORCELAIN GLASSWARE 
AND LEATHER GOODS- 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO DESIGNING AND MAKING 

TROPHIES. EMBLEMS. PRIZES, MEDALS. CLASS PINS. 

AND NOVELTIES IN GOLD. SILVER AND BRONZE 



MOUNTING DIAMONDS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY 

MONTGOMERY and SUTTER STREETS 




the GRANDEST 

e/\/MD no$T 
RUSTIC J^lUTRRsY 

BVtRs PRODUCED. 

vl; 

JN ITS OW^T 

co5TLy and Spacious 

- - O © o o • 

^RRKEr^I0 TH > 

<£AV FR/INCISCO. 

CLOSE TO>THE- 
(2A\ECi-iANIC6"' 
„ ' PAVILION. 



'■^U 



the Battle raJi saved the: Nation 



Gerii6 




« praised 

HOWARD, GfcAHAH,] 

r% Entire press*- 

°p San franciso 

'MVppominenr 1 
^ ' citTzer^ 

aqd War* Critic - 



^k 








Panorama & saiuseum open dail/ from 9 An to u r> /m 



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